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Part 2: 1750-1805
Part 3: 1791-1831
Part 4: 1831-1865

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Modern Voices
Margaret Washington on Virginians' concerns about white and black servants
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Q: Given the conditions and the sense of isolation in a colony like Virginia, was there a real concern around this emerging class of white and black workers who begin to become a threat? Do you feel that that has anything to do with why it begins to start shifting towards an enslaved class?
Margaret Washington

A: You can't discount the notion that black and white servants and slaves were going to unite over their common oppression. We have evidence of them running away together. We have evidence of them rising against their masters together. They lived together. They slept together. So yes, there was a possibility of a lower class surge against the elites. So that's a very important consideration for the Virginians, in terms of wanting to create one kind of labor force.
Margaret Washington
Associate Professor of History
Cornell Universiy




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