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Part 4: 1831-1865

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Historical Document
The Richmond Enquirer on Nat Turner's Rebellion
1831

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Click here for the text of this historical document.

On August 30, 1831, in the days following Nat Turner's Rebellion, two months before his capture, The Richmond Enquirer published a description of the rebels' "murderous career" that likened them to "a parcel of blood-thirsty wolves rushing down from the Alps; or rather like a former incursion of the Indians upon the white settlements." The lesson gleaned by the writer of the article from the case of Turner, "who had been taught to read and write, and permitted to go about preaching," was that "No black man ought to be permitted to turn a Preacher through the country."

Credit was given to "many of the slaves whom gratitude had bound to their masters, that thy had manifested the grestest alacrity in detecting and apprehending many of the brigands."

According to the article, General Broadnax, the militia commander of Greensville County, was "convinced, from various sources" of the "entire ignorance on the subject of all the slaves in the counties around Southampton, among whom he has never known more pefect order and quiet to prevail."




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Nat Turner's Rebellion





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