Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
BUILDING BIG LogoWho Builds Big? Career Info
BUILDING BIG Home Page BUILDING BIG Site Map BUILDING BIG Labs BUILDING BIG Databank BUILDING BIG Glossary
Bridges
Domes
Skyscrapers
Dams
Tunnels
Buy the DVD
_  

Environmental Engineering
Who Builds Big Index | Engineering Webography | Career Info Index

Environmental engineers design systems to provide safe drinking water and to prevent pollution in water, in the air, and on the land. Environmental engineers are involved in water supply systems, wastewater treatment facilities, sewage treatment plants, cleanup of toxic waste sites, recycling, reduction of air pollution, and pesticide control.

Meet an environmental engineer: Miles Moffatt

Education
Environmental engineers must graduate from an accredited college or university with a Bachelor of Science in engineering -- either civil, chemical, mechanical, or environmental. However, more and more employers today prefer individuals with a Master's degree in environmental engineering. Twenty-six universities and colleges in the United States offer degrees in environmental engineering. Required courses include math, science, engineering, and humanities. Environmental engineers must be able to communicate effectively with a variety of organizations, so writing and speaking courses are also encouraged in college.

Fast Facts
Number of people in profession: 83,500*
Percentage male: 90
Percentage female: 10
Average salary: $55,000

People You Will Work With
Civil engineers, government agencies, testing laboratories

* Based on a 1999 National Science Foundation survey


  _
_