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Adaptive Radiation: Darwin's Finches

There are now at least 13 species of finches on the Galapagos Islands, each filling a different niche on different islands. All of them evolved from one ancestral species, which colonized the islands only a few million years ago. This process, whereby species evolve rapidly to exploit empty ecospace, is known as adaptive radiation.

Adaptive Radiation: Darwin's Finches

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Adaptive Radiation: Darwin's Finches:

When Charles Darwin stepped ashore on the Galapagos Islands in September 1835, it was the start of five weeks that would change the world of science, although he did not know it at the time. Among other finds, he observed and collected the variety of small birds that inhabited the islands, but he did not realize their significance, and failed to keep good records of his specimens and where they were collected. It was not until he was back in London, puzzling over the birds, that the realization that they were all different, but closely related, species of finch led him toward formulating the principle of natural selection.
In his memoir, The Voyage of the Beagle, Darwin noted, almost as if in awe, "One might really fancy that, from an original paucity of birds in this archipelago, one species had been taken and modified for different ends."
Indeed, the Galapagos have been called a living laboratory where speciation can be seen at work. A few million years ago, one species of finch migrated to the rocky Galapagos from the mainland of Central or South America. From this one migrant species would come many -- at least 13 species of finch evolving from the single ancestor.
This process in which one species gives rise to multiple species that exploit different niches is called adaptive radiation. The ecological niches exert the selection pressures that push the populations in various directions. On various islands, finch species have become adapted for different diets: seeds, insects, flowers, the blood of seabirds, and leaves.
The ancestral finch was a ground-dwelling, seed-eating finch. After the burst of speciation in the Galapagos, a total of 14 species would exist: three species of ground-dwelling seed-eaters; three others living on cactuses and eating seeds; one living in trees and eating seeds; and 7 species of tree-dwelling insect-eaters.
Scientists long after Darwin spent years trying to understand the process that had created so many types of finches that differed mainly in the size and shape of their beaks.
Most recently, Peter and Rosemary Grant have spent many years in the Galapagos, seeing changing climatic conditions from year to year dramatically altering the food supply. As a result, certain of the finches have lived or died depending on which species' beak structure was best adapted for the most abundant food -- just as Darwin would have predicted.

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