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Darwin's Letters: Collecting Evidence

Darwin sought information from his many contacts to help him refine his theory. In these letters, he discusses the range of variation that can be observed in both wild and domestic animals, his observations on the number of seedlings that are eaten by slugs, and whether seeds and small snails are ever transported on the feet of wading birds. All of this varied information helped him form his theory and convinced him that the process of evolution which he proposed could in fact explain the patterns he saw in the natural world.

Credits: Charles Darwin's Letters: A Selection 1825-1859. Edited by Frederick Burkhardt. Cambridge University Press 1996. Reprinted with the permission of Cambridge University Press.

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The Age of Darwin

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