Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
NOVA Home Find out what's coming up on air Listing of previous NOVA Web sites NOVA's history Subscribe to the NOVA bulletin Lesson plans and more for teachers NOVA RSS feeds Tell us what you think Program transcripts Buy NOVA videos or DVDs Watch NOVA programs online Answers to frequently asked questions

A Prisoner's Sketchbook


Great Escape homepage

Launch Slide Show A Prisoner's Sketchbook

Several months before the Great Escape, the senior British officer in the Stalag Luft III camp asked fellow prisoner and artist Ley Kenyon to create a visual document of "Harry," the tunnel used the night of March 24, 1944, to make the break. Kenyon obliged, rendering six drawings inside Harry's cramped quarters. The drawings were sealed in a watertight container fabricated from old milk tins and stored in "Dick," an abandoned escape tunnel. When the advancing Russians neared the camp in January 1945, the Germans hastily evacuated the prisoners, who just managed to flood Dick in hopes of deterring a search if the Germans discovered the tunnel. They never did, and when the Russians seized control of the camp, a British officer who had been too ill to evacuate earlier with the other prisoners recovered the drawings and brought them to England; they now reside in the Royal Air Force Museum in London. In this slide show, view these hard-won sketches, along with five others Kenyon made either before or after the famous getaway. To launch the slide show, click on the image at left.—Peter Tyson








  

Send Feedback Image Credits
   
NOVA Home Find out what's coming up on air Listing of previous NOVA Web sites NOVA's history Subscribe to the NOVA bulletin Lesson plans and more for teachers NOVA RSS feeds Tell us what you think Program transcripts Buy NOVA videos or DVDs Watch NOVA programs online Answers to frequently asked questions

Support provided by

For new content
visit the redesigned
NOVA site