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Mountain Weather


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For those who live on or near mountains, a change of climate can be just a short walk away. That's because mountains create their own microclimates—areas in which the climate differs from the prevailing climate. Take Kilimanjaro. This 19,340-foot volcano in Tanzania has microclimates that range from scorching at the base to frigid at the summit. (For a look at the mountain's six ecological zones, see Tour Kilimanjaro.) The flow of air masses over Kilimanjaro and other mountains also influences microclimates, often causing wet (or snowy) weather on one side and a dry, clear climate on the other.

To see how the movement of air creates different microclimates on a mountain, click on the image at left. — Rick Groleau

   

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