ANTIQUES ROADSHOW visited the Japanese American Museum of San Jose to explore the beautiful and poignant art work of Japanese and Japanese Americans held at camps around the United States during World War II.

The human drive to create, even under difficult conditions, is a strong one. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW visited the Japanese American Museum of San Jose during its 2014 trip to Santa Clara in order to explore remarkable arts and crafts made by Japanese and Japanese-Americans held in U.S. internment camps during World War II. These works express beauty, dignity and perseverance in the face of hardship and injustice.

At right, meet Jimi Yamaichi, founder and chief curator of the Japanese American Museum of San Jose. As a young man during World War II, Yamaichi was interned in camps at Heart Mountain in Wyoming and Tule Lake, California. Watch our interview to learn some of his recollections.

Below, hear Delphine Hirasuna, author of The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps 1942-1946 and curator of the traveling exhibit of the same name, talk about the Japanese tradition of creating a symbolic garment of protection and what happened when Japanese-American men left the internment camps to serve in the United States military during World War II.

Author Antiques Roadshow