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    Three North Carolina universities have experienced growing hostility and violence toward Muslims; students and instructors at Yale Institute of Sacred Music speak artistically and spiritually about the power of experiencing religious music; and reality TV producer Mark Burnett describes a project to help refugees fleeing persecution and violence in Syria. More

    May 8, 2015 | Comments

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    “We have [Muslim] folks who worship here in Chapel Hill who refrain from publicizing and making it known where they worship, when they come together. They tell me it’s because they have concerns about their safety,” says Mark Kleinschmidt, mayor of Chapel Hill, North Carolina where three Muslim students were murdered in February. More

    May 8, 2015 | Comments

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    “There is something about the experience of a big group of people singing together, and really singing from the bottom of their hearts, and it does something to you that lifts us out of the intellectual pursuits we do all day long,” says Maggi Dawn, dean of Yale’s Marquand Chapel. More

    May 8, 2015 | Comments

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    “We have managed through our fund to help 72,000 Christians get through the harsh Syrian winter. Imagine surviving persecution and the threats of death, only to freeze to death.” More

    May 8, 2015 | Comments

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    Episcopal Bishop of Maryland Eugene Sutton discusses the moral voice of churches in response to Baltimore’s problems of race, poverty, and violence; the Supreme Court hears lawyers argue a case that could make same-sex marriage legal in every state; and Jewish converts talk about both the fulfillment and the challenges they have found in their new faith. More

    May 1, 2015 | Comments

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    “It took many parts of very many communities to make peace in Baltimore,” says Eugene Sutton, Episcopal Bishop of Maryland. “Religious leaders from all over the city—Christian mainly, Muslim and Jewish leaders—got out on the streets and congregations and really proclaimed a message of hope and of nonviolence and peace. City officials did the same.” More

    May 1, 2015 | Comments

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    John Bursch, the main lawyer arguing why the states should not be required to license same-sex marriages, summed the issue up this way: “You can love your neighbor no matter what their sexual orientation is—what choices they make about their life—and still have a disagreement about what marriage means. And the question is who gets to decide the meaning of marriage?” More

    May 1, 2015 | Comments

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    “For Judaism to survive in the 21st century and beyond, it needs to be broad, and to not accept converts in the most inclusive way possible challenges that breadth and potentially narrows who we are,” says Shmuly Yanklowitz, an Orthodox rabbi and himself a convert to Judaism. More

    May 1, 2015 | Comments

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    Growing social acceptance of gay marriage and an upcoming Supreme Court case cause some evangelicals to reexamine their views on sexuality and marriage; criminal justice reformers question the social and economic costs of extreme punishments, lengthy sentences, and a history … More

    April 24, 2015 | Comments

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    Same-sex marriage is already legal in 36 states and the District of Columbia, but the Supreme Court will soon hear oral arguments that could make it legal in every state.  “Christianity requires you to push back against the world,” says Collin Hansen of the Gospel Coalition. But author Matthew Vines suggests that once even some evangelicals are willing to change their position, then “it starts to significantly shift the dynamic.” More

    April 24, 2015 | Comments