Web Video: Rosalind Wyman, trailblazing woman on LA city council, dreams of a woman in the White House

Dec. 06, 2016 AT 5:03 p.m. EST

We asked the reporters who covered the 2016 presidential campaign to share the most memorable person they met on the campaign trail. Lisa Lerer of AP shares the story of Rosalind Wyman.

It's been a month since Hillary Clinton lost the presidential election and left the "highest, hardest glass ceiling" unshattered. But for the female politicians who blazed the trail before Clinton, they still dream of a woman serving in the Oval Office. Rosalind Wyman is one of them. The 84-year-old was once only the second woman to serve on the Los Angeles City Council and hoped to see the historic election of Clinton. As she told AP political reporter Lisa Lerer, many younger women ssume a woman will one day be elected president, but many older women like Wyman felt this would be their last chance in their lifetime. "This would have been something really historic and I think it's important that we don't lose sight of that particularly given how heated the rhetoric got around gender," Lerer says.

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TRANSCRIPT

Notice: Transcripts are machine and human generated and lightly edited for accuracy. They may contain errors.

One person who particularly stands out to me from the campaign trail was an 84-year-old woman, the second woman to ever be elected to the LA City Council, who I spoke to for a story that never ran on Hillary Clinton shattering the glass ceiling. And this woman talked about how meaningful it was that Hillary Clinton was going to be president how she never dreamed this day could come even though she had been working to get women in public office her entire career. And she was pinching herself and she was so nervous that it wasn't going to happen -- of course it didn't happen -- and I thought it was interesting because a lot was made about how you know whether this was momentous and whether women really did care about having the first woman president. I think younger women we saw again and again didn't, they assume that this is something that would happen in their lifetime and they didn't particularly care, but for older women, particularly those who weren't sure that they would, who felt that this was their last chance, this was a really meaningful thing. And I can tell you there's a lot of, amongst that community, there's a lot of broken hearts. But this would have been something really historic and I think it's important that we don't lose sight of that particularly given how heated the rhetoric got around gender. In a lot of points this campaign felt like a war of the sexes in some ways. So that woman really sticks with me.

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