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YehudaBerg

Faithbook YehudaBerg

A bestselling author and luminary authority on Kabbalah, Yehuda Berg is part of a long line of Kabbalistic masters, and the son of Rav and Karen Berg. Recognized as “the world’s leading authority on the Kabbalah movement” by Newsweek, the magazine named him as one of the top five rabbis in the U.S. in 2007. In 2009, GQ magazine’s The Gentlemen’s Fund honored him for being an Agent of Change in the field of Education. Yehuda has authored more than 30 books on topics ranging from self-empowerment and depression to sex and the Bible. His bestsellers are "The Power of Kabbalah" and "The 72 Names of God", which have been translated into 20 and 14 languages respectively. His daily Tune-ups are sent to more than 200,000 fans, and he contributes regularly to Huffington Post. Yehuda speaks internationally and teaches thousands of people from all walks of life. He believes in the power of human consciousness and personal transformation, and utilizes Kabbalah as a tool for change. Yehuda is co-director of Kabbalah Centre International, Inc. Founded in 1922, KCI is the leading organization dedicated to bringing Kabbalah to everyone with the desire to learn. Twitter- @yehudaberg; Facebook- /yehuda.berg

How Do You Imagine God?
God in America and USA WEEKEND Magazine are partnering to explore Americans' images of God.

How do you imagine God? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator I imagine God to be like my father. My father was always the voice of certainty in my life. Certainty in the wisdom, certainty in the path, certainty always in God. For me God is certainty in everything. Certainty that everything is good and everything is God. 6 people liked this

My Beliefs

My greatest moment of doubt was ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator When my father, teacher and spiritual leader suffered a bi-lateral stroke. For a moment I thought I was done; until I realized that I had a choice to make. I decided to persevere. We all get a test like that in life where we come up against our greatest fear or challenge and think we will shut down. But that ‘s the moment we need to find our strength and conviction and keep going. 5 people liked this
My spiritual life means... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator To me spirituality means no matter what. One stays on the path, one commits to love, one does ones work; one follows one’s dream; one shares, tries not to judge, no matter what. 5 people liked this
The biggest misconception about my faith/belief system is ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator The biggest misconception about Kabbalah is that it’s shallow. Kabbalah is a life-long study. It’s a wisdom and teaching that infinitely expands consciousness and growth, as long as we take it seriously and stay with it. It can serve us for a moment, or a lifetime. It’s up to the user. We can study the same story, the same piece of text and each time uncover a more profound message about the nature of life, this world, and ultimately about ourselves. 4 people liked this
My spiritual role model is ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator My Mother. Karen is the source of my soul, the inspiration that keeps me and so many others fueled. My mother doesn’t just talk spirituality, she embodies it. She is love and kindness in any circumstance no matter what. 6 people liked this
The tenet/practice/teaching I appreciate most about my faith is ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator What I appreciate most about the teachings of Kabbalah is that our imperfections do not make us less. Darkness is the only path to light. It is not our wonderful gifts that make us closer to God: it’s using our garbage to transform ourselves. This is the key that unlocks the door that opens to God. 4 people liked this

How I Practice My Faith

Where and when do you practice your faith? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator Every moment for me is a chance to expand my consciousness. I try to be aware all the time. But in truth, the times when I experience the most certainty and consciousness are after I have fallen, and the universe gives me a chance to “do over”. That’s when I am awestruck by the mercy of the Creator, and all that we have been given. 5 people liked this
Does your family practice more than one religion or faith? If so, how do you blend the traditions? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator I happen to be of the Jewish religion. And we are traditionally orthodox. But it is the wisdom of Kabbalah that enhances my practice and makes it richer, more meaningful and more inclusive of others. 2 people liked this
How easy or difficult is it to live your faith? Why? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator It is both easy and difficult for me to live my path. I was born into the wisdom I teach and live by. This means that I did not choose it for myself. It was simply given to me. Because of that I need to earn appreciation for it every day. Which is difficult. Of course I was never a seeker, nor did I have to live through a personal disaster to develop a language with God. It’s a constant battle everyday; one that is unique to a person born to a lineage rather than having to chose it. 3 people liked this
In my house, the thing that most represents my faith is ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator Acceptance and adventure. In my family, both my mother and father as well as the wisdom we teach, are about acceptance and adventure. Acceptance of yourself and others, while living out the adventure and journey of life with excitement and joy. 4 people liked this
The song/book/film that most represents my faith is ... your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator “One” by U2 4 people liked this

Religion & the Public Square

What should be the role of religion in politics? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator When you look back at the political history of this country, the original intent of politics was a spiritual one. Our forefathers wanted to create a system that would put the needs of others before the needs of ourselves. Albert Pike a confederate military officer, said it best when he said, “What we have done for ourselves alone dies with us; what we have done for others and the world remains and is immortal.” 5 people liked this
Should courses about religion be taught in public schools? Why or why not? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator I don’t believe that schools are a place to teach religion, but rather spirituality and the interconnectedness of all things. Our individual and collective responsibility is to the whole. To understand that our actions have effects, for ourselves, our families, our communities, and for the world. 4 people liked this
Should the Bible, Torah, Quran or other religious texts be taught as works of literature in public schools? Why or why not? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator I do believe that the original sources of all religions should be taught, because with that we will find our similarities, not just our differences. I believe that if Mohammed, Buddha, Jesus, and Moses all got together they would be best of friends because the spiritual basis of all religions is something that builds unity. Education is a key element in the development of universal tolerance. 5 people liked this
Is interfaith dialogue important? Why or why not? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator I believe interfaith listening is important. The goal should not just be to talk, it should be to listen. We need to come to the conversation not just wanting to be heard, but wanting to really hear. If we can do that, then I think we can change the future of interfaith relations. 4 people liked this
Do you feel comfortable discussing your faith with others? Why/why not? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator In truth I am a Kabbalist, and Kabbalah doesn’t fit into any existing religion because it’s not a religion. When I traveled to a peace conference in Madrid that King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia had called together with Juan Carlos, King of Spain, the conference administrator had trouble deciding which religion to classify me under. The Jews didn’t want me to sit with them, the Christians didn’t think I belonged, and the Muslims weren’t sure. That’s because Kabbalah is not a doctrine or a set of rules. It’s a wisdom, a technology that helps to awaken the soul. You can go to a mosque, church or temple and practice any religion and still be a Kabbalist: someone who desires to develop a relationship with the Creator. 4 people liked this
Do you feel that you have a duty, because of your faith, to put your beliefs into action? What are some of those actions? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator The wisdom that I teach and practice insists on action. Words and intentions that do not manifest into positive deeds are meaningless. Doing something for others -- from as simple as feeding the homeless, to launching a website for global awareness of human trafficking – this is what gives life meaning. Whatever your passion is, turn it into something actionable for others. 5 people liked this
Has 9/11 had any impact on your thoughts about religion? Are you more/less interested in learning about other religions? Do you feel more/less comfortable expressing your religious beliefs? your photo/ link/ video has been held for approval by a moderator 9/11 had tremendous impact on me and my family. The message I got from it was simple: it does not take many people to change the world. In 9/11 a handful of people changed the world; unfortunately it was a negative outcome. We have to stop thinking our actions are meaningless, and that we are small. 9/11 taught us that we can change the world with only a handful of people. Our goal should be to change it constructively, not destructively. 5 people liked this

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Published October 11, 2010

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