Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Our Genes Our Choices
Who Gets To Know Genes On Trial
What Do You Know Could We Should We Science Sidebars About Fred Friendly Get Involved
Making Better Babies: Genetics & Reproduction
About the Program
Meet the Participants
Read Real Stories
Viewer's Guide
Resources
Video Highlights
Take a Poll
Poll
The number of medical conditions with a testable genetic component is growing rapidly. Who should make sure that prospective parents are kept informed?

Parents themselves
Health professionals
The government
Not sure

A genetic test usually reveals a range of probabilities that a medical condition may develop. If this information is limited or ambiguous, should it still be passed along to prospective parents?

Yes
No
Not sure

Altering the genetic makeup of a child may one day be possible, even commonplace. Do we risk creating a genetic underclass of people who cannot afford access to such procedures?

Yes
No
Not sure

If the technology becomes available, should parents have the option of selecting genes in their offspring that influence physical traits such as height, athletic ability, and eye color?

Yes
No
Not sure

A number of mammals have already been cloned successfully, and safe human cloning may one day be possible. Can you think of situations in which cloning humans would be ethically acceptable?

Yes
No
Not sure


[an error occurred while processing this directive]