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Tomorrow's America
EveryOther
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EveryOther
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"EveryOther," shot in Washington, DC, New York and New Jersey, examines the new racial classifications on the U.S. census through the concerns and deliberation of mixed-race people. Incorporating a stylistic blend of satirical fiction and cinema verité, the personal meets the political in this identity war story. Popular culture, particularly in sports and entertainment, boasts an unprecedented number of mixed-race and culturally ambiguous figures for young people to admire and emulate: Mariah Carey, Tiger Woods, Ben Harper and Halle Berry to name a few. Consequently, many young people are more closely identified with the music they hear and fashion they wear than the color of their skin. Utilizing the writing of Danzy Senna ("Caucasia") and directed by Phil Bertelsen, the film explores what this means for the future of racial identity in America.

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Matters of Race

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"'Mulattoes, Half-Breeds, and Hapas': Multiracial Representation in the Movies"
by Greg Pak


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Susan Graham, , Founder, Project R.A.C.E.listen

"When I received my 1990 census form, I just realized that there wasn't a place on the form for my children's races. And, wanting to do the right thing as a good American citizen. I called the Census Bureau, just like anyone else would. And the gentleman told me he didn't really know what I should do. Finally he said, "We've got the answer. I talked to a supervisor. The children take the race of the mother." And I said, "Well, why not the father? Why arbitrarily the mother?" And his voice became very hushed, and he said, "Because in cases like these we always know who the mother is, and we don't know who the father is."
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