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January 9, 2009

Ask the Reporter: EXPOSÉ on BILL MOYERS JOURNAL

This week, BILL MOYERS JOURNAL collaborated with EXPOSÉ: AMERICA'S INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS to tell the story of journalist David Heath from THE SEATTLE TIMES as he investigates earmarks and uncovers stories of waste and abuse in Washington.

We'd like to thank David Heath for agreeing to answer your questions. Please post below, and we will post his response in a few weeks.


December 19, 2008

Ask the Reporters: EXPOSÉ on BILL MOYERS JOURNAL

This week, BILL MOYERS JOURNAL collaborated with EXPOSÉ: AMERICA'S INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS to follow the story of a journalist, Eric Nalder from the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, as he reported on a whistleblower's account of abuse of military housing contracts.

We thank Eric Nalder of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER for taking time to answer your questions, which you can post below. We will post his response in a few weeks.


December 17, 2008

EXPOSÉ: Michael Riley Answers Viewer Questions on Reservation Justice

We thank reporter Michael Riley of the DENVER POST for taking time to answer questions about the controversial justice system on Indian reservations across America.

Please note that the views and opinions expressed by Michael Riley are not necessarily the views and opinions held by Bill Moyers or BILL MOYERS JOURNAL.

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Question: I was aware of the complicated judicial system enforced in the Native American reservations, but I was appalled to find out the statistics that involve so many unsolved crimes and lack of any accountability by the US Attorneys and the FBI. Has there been any improvement since the exposure of the DENVER POST investigation and how can we help to raise more awareness to the public?

-- Sara Pollock

Answer: Thanks for the question, Sara. As far as I can tell, there has been little improvement in the situation since the publication of the series -- in part because the Department of Justice doesn't acknowledge even now that a problem exists. There was a recent experiment on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota that did show some results, however.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs implemented what they called a "surge" -- significantly increasing the number of police officers on that reservation in an effort to dampen rising crime. The surge was designed to be temporary, but did show some success (after an initial increase, arrests suddenly dropped). It shows that more resources can make a difference. But those resources will have to be sustained over time -- and that will cost a significant amount of money.

Continue reading "EXPOSÉ: Michael Riley Answers Viewer Questions on Reservation Justice" »


September 15, 2008

EXPOSÉ: Reporters Answer Viewer Questions

We thank BUSINESSWEEK reporters Brian Grow, Paul Barrett, Keith Epstein, and Robert Berner for taking time to answer your questions about their story on "The Business of Poverty."

Please note that the views and opinions expressed by the reporters are not necessarily the views and opinions held by Bill Moyers or BILL MOYERS JOURNAL.

Continue reading "EXPOSÉ: Reporters Answer Viewer Questions" »


July 16, 2008

EXPOSÉ: Reporters Answer Viewer Questions

We thank reporters Franco Ordoñez, Kerry Hall and Ames Alexander for taking time to answer your questions about their story on working conditions in poultry plants. The CHARLOTTE OBSERVER recently reported on the indictment of a House of Raeford manager.

Please note that the views and opinions expressed by the reporters are not necessarily the views and opinions held by Bill Moyers or BILL MOYERS JOURNAL.

Continue reading "EXPOSÉ: Reporters Answer Viewer Questions" »


June 27, 2008

Ask the Reporters: EXPOSÉ on BILL MOYERS JOURNAL

This week, BILL MOYERS JOURNAL collaborated with EXPOSÉ: AMERICA'S INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS to tell the story of several journalists investigating working conditions in poultry plants.

We thank reporters Franco Ordoñez, Kerry Hall and Ames Alexander for taking time to answer your questions about the story. We will post their responses next week.


June 3, 2008

Exposé Reporters Answer Your Questions

We thank reporters Cary Spivak, Susanne Rust and Meg Kissinger for taking time to answer your questions about Exposé's story on their work following the chemical Bisphenol A.

Please note that the views and opinions expressed by the reporters are not necessarily the views and opinions held by Bill Moyers or BILL MOYERS JOURNAL.


I would very much like to know what is happening in the European Union regarding Bisphenol A. Is the EU addressing the safety of BPA? Thank you so much.

The European Union's food safety watchdog, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), may review the chemical Bisphenol A, the agency website says.
"EFSA is aware of the studies on bisphenol published in the United States and Canada. The agency will examine whether it should review its opinion on this product, which dates from January 2007," spokeswoman Anne-Laure Gassin said.


Bravo! Wonderful reporting. Can you please tell me which plastics contain the toxic substances? Are they marked in any way, i.e. by the number in the triangle on the bottom? Many thanks to you for such a wonderful expose.

Plastic containers with the recycling number 7 often contain polycarbonate, which contains Bisphenol A. You should know that not all plastic containers have recycling labels on them, including baby bottles and sippy cups. Those with the no. 3 on them are made of polyvinyl chloride which may contain Bisphenol A as well as phthalates, another kind of endocrine disruptor.


In your opinion, if the government does decide to act and announces that Bisphenol A poses enough of a risk to ban it from products such as water bottles an the linings of metal cans, what will the fall-out or repercussions be? Will the millions(?) of products inflate in cost along with the regular inflating? Will we see certain products being recalled? What other chemicals are we being exposed to that could cause great health risks that the government has ignored due to corporate manipulation and interests?

Several companies are removing bisphenol A from their products or merchandise, including Nalgene, Wal-Mart and Toys R Us. Many are working to develop alternatives to Bisphenol A. We'll be watching to see what the effects on the marketplace will be.
There still are many chemicals in use that scientists are suspicious of and others that are known to be dangerous that remain in the marketplace.


Do you think that there will be more reporters like yourselves -- with specialized science backgrounds? Does the consumer's ability to access more and more information hampering or helping beat journalism?

There probably will be more reporters with specialized backgrounds in science -- also law, education, the arts, etc. It's a really interesting question to wonder if more information by consumers hampers or helps beat reporters. It probably helps. The more consumers know, the better their questions will be. They will be pushing us to ask more and tougher questions.


The report says that from 1996 to 2007 --- a period that had both parties in the White House --- the EPA hadn't screened a single chemical. Are both parties compromised by the chemical lobby's influence?

We will let the educated viewers of PBS figure that out.


What was the $80 million for endocrine research actually spent on, if not chemical testing?

The $80 million went for "payroll and program support" to develop the screening program, according to the EPA spokespeople. They had a lot of meetings to discuss how to screen these chemicals. They went through no fewer than three different permutations of the program.


It's always heartening to see good, relevant journalism. Thank you. How does one determine what plastic items contain Bisphenol A? Can it be purged from the body once ingested?

Look for recycling no. 7 -- and generally any hard, non-disposable clear plastic is likely to contain Bisphenol A. Children and adults break down Bisphenol A pretty quickly. But there is nearly constant exposure. So, the body gets inundated. Research shows that very young babies and fetuses may not be able to break it down because they lack an enzyme that allows them to do so.


May 23, 2008

Ask the Reporters: Exposé on Bill Moyers Journal

This week, BILL MOYERS JOURNAL collaborated with EXPOSÉ: AMERICA'S INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS to tell the story of several journalists' work in exploring the potential threat of the chemical Bisphenol A in Americans' food.

We thank reporters Cary Spivak, Susanne Rust and Meg Kissinger for taking time to answer your questions about the story. We will post their responses next week.


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