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Miles O'Brien
Science Correspondent

Miles O'Brien

Miles O’Brien is veteran, independent journalist who focuses on science, technology and aerospace.

He is the science correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, a producer and director for the PBS science documentary series NOVA, and a correspondent for the PBS documentary series FRONTLINE and the National Science Foundation Science Nation series.

For nearly seventeen of his thirty-two years in the news business, he worked for CNN as the science, environment and aerospace space correspondent and the anchor of various programs, including American Morning.

While at CNN, he secured a deal with NASA to become the first journalist to fly on the space shuttle. The project ended with the loss of Columbia and her crew in 2003 – a story he told to the world in a critically acclaimed sixteen-hour marathon of live coverage.

Prior to joining CNN, he worked as a reporter at television stations in Boston, Tampa, Albany, NY and St. Joseph, MO. He began his television career as a desk assistant at WRC-TV in Washington, DC.

O’Brien is an accomplished aviator and aircraft owner who often pilots his airplane to assignments, and is frequently called upon to explain the world of aviation to a mass audience.

He has won numerous awards over the years, including a half-dozen Emmys, and a Peabody and DuPont for his coverage of Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath.

Born in Detroit and raised in Grosse Pointe Farms, MI, he is based in Washington, DC. He has a son at the US Naval Academy and a daughter at Davidson College in North Carolina. He was a history major at Georgetown University.

Miles's Most Recent Stories

  • May 31, 2014

    What causes a seemingly happy, non-violent teenager to open fire on classmates? Science correspondent Miles O’Brien reports on the minds of rampage killers by profiling Andy Williams, who killed two students in a school shooting in California. Continue reading

  • February 12, 2014

    3-D printers will never serve up a rare juicy steak, a baked potato or the salad the “Food-a-Rac-a-Cycle” can, but before too long, they might be able to produce “Earl Grey tea – hot,” as the Replicator does for Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the Star Trek movies. Continue reading

  • January 20, 2014

    At the bottom of a nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario, scientists at one of the world’s most sophisticated particle physics observatories are investigating one of the biggest mysteries of the cosmos: What is dark matter? Science correspondent Miles O’Brien helps to shed some light on the research at SNOLAB. Continue reading

  • May 29, 2013

    The New York Police Department’s facial identification unit might not quite measure up to Hollywood standards, but they are on the cusp of a big change in the way police do their job. Miles O’Brien examines the software that turned the grainiest of images into information used to identify the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. Continue reading

  • May 28, 2013

    NewsHour science correspondent Miles O’Brien visits the nation’s most active explosives testing facility in New Mexico to learn more about what makes a pressure cooker bomb — like those used at the Boston Marathon — tick. Investigators often use the center to test theories and find new ways to defend against future attacks. Continue reading