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This Far by Faith

Journeys

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1526-1775: from AFRICA to AMERICA1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER1967-TODAY: from CRISIS, A SEARCH FOR MEANINGTODAY: The Journey Continues
1526-1775: from AFRICA to AMERICA1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER
1526-1775: from AFRICA to AMERICA1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER
1967-TODAY: from CRISIS, A SEARCH FOR MEANING
Next Timeline
TODAY: The Journey Continues
Timeline: 1967-TODAY
TODAY: The Journey Continues
TODAY: The Journey Continues




1967: KWANZAA CREATED back to top

Maulana Karenga, an African-American activist, creates Kwanzaa, a celebration held annually between Christmas and New Year's Day, to "restore and reaffirm African heritage and culture." It is based on seven principals that reinforce family, community and culture among African Americans.

1968: NON-VIOLENCE UNDER ATTACK back to top


William Gladsen attacked by K-9 units in Birmingham, Alabama

Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist church, the largest congregation in New York City, says that nonviolence is no longer the most effective civil rights strategy.

1968: MLK JR. ASSASSINATED back to top

Martin Luther King Jr. is shot while standing on a hotel balcony in Memphis, Tennessee. He dies later at a hospital. Conspiracy theories about his assassination abound. His death provokes riots in 14 cities, and national mourning.

1968: A WAR ON RACISM back to top

The Roman catholic church in the US declares war on racism.

1969: THE BLACK MANIFESTO back to top

Civil-rights leader James Forman reads The Black Manifesto at Riverside Church in NYC. Forman demands $500 million in reparations from American churches for their role in perpetuating slavery. While Forman receives some funds, including $15,000 from the mostly white Washington Square United Methodist Church in Newark, NJ, his success lies primarily in initiating a national debate about the responsibility of churches for their past positions on slavery.

1969: NATIONAL BLACK SISTERS' CONFERENCE back to top

Sister M. Martin de Porres Grey organizes 155 women from 79 national and international congregations to form the National Black Sisters' Conference (NBSC). The NBSC speaks out about racism and sexism found in society and the church.

1969: BLACK THEOLOGY AND BLACK POWER back to top


Cover of Cone's Black Theology and Black Power

James H. Cone, a professor at Union Theological Seminary, publishes his seminal Black Theology and Black Power. The book links Jesus' struggle against human oppression with the African-American struggle against racial oppression in America.

1970: YORUBA VILLAGE FOUNDED back to top

Nana Adefunmi and a few families create Oyotunji Village in Sheldon, South Carolina. They want to institutionalize a Yoruba way of life and fully break from Santeria by establishing a community for people deeply committed to Yoruba.

1975: NEW NATION OF ISLAM LEADERSHIP back to top


Wallace Mohammed at podium, at a Muslim rally in the Uline Arena

Upon the death of Elijah Muhammad, his son, W.D. Muhammad, takes over Nation of Islam leadership. He changes the structure to adhere more closely to orthodox Islam and renames the organization The World Community of Al-Islam. Louis Farrakhan is the organization's international spokesperson until 1977, when he breaks with W.D. Muhammad to revive the Nation of Islam and continue the traditions of Elijah Muhammad.

1977: ALEX HALEY'S ROOTS back to top

Alex Haley's Roots, an epic that follows seven generations of a family from Africa to Arkansas, breaks the TV ratings record established by Gone With the Wind when 130 million Americans tune in to the mini-series.

1978: CONGRESS OF NATIONAL BLACK CHURCHES FORMED back to top

The seven largest black Christian denominations organize the Congress of National Black Churches.

1984: REV. JESSE JACKSON RUNS FOR PRESIDENT back to top

Rev. Jesse Jackson becomes the first black candidate to run for president of the United States. He wins 3.5 million primary votes. He runs again in 1988, and is endorsed by more than 90% of black clergy, and wins 6.1 million votes.

1993: THOMAS DORSEY DIES back to top


An older Thomas Dorsey in preacher's robes, singing or praying

Thomas Dorsey, the "Father of Gospel Music," dies at age 93 in Chicago, IL

1993: VATICAN APOLOGY back to top

Pope John Paul II apologizes for the Catholic Church's historical support of African slave trade.

1995: MILLION MAN MARCH back to top


Crowd gathered for the Million Man March

In Washington, D.C., between 400,000 and 1 million black men join the Million Man March organized by the Nation of Islam's Louis Farrakhan.

1998: INTERFAITH PILGRIMAGE back to top


Ingrid, Clare, and Raina before the pilgrimage

The Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage sets out from Massachusetts to trace the historical route of the slave trade between Africa and America. The pilgrimage brings together participants of different faiths, genders, and races on a journey of healing.

Back to Journey 1993: Vatican Apology 1995: Million Man March 1993: Thomas Dorsey Dies 1998: Interfaith Pilgrimage 1968: MLK Jr. Assassinated 1978: Congress of National Black Churches Formed 1984: Rev. Jesse Jackson Runs for President 1977: Alex Haley's "Roots" 1969: The Black Manifesto 1975: New Nation of Islam Leadership 1969: National Black Sisiters' Conference 1970: Yoruba Village Founded 1968: A War on Racism 1969: Black Theology and Black Power 1967: Kwanzaa Created 1968: Non-violence Under Attack