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This Far by Faith

Journeys

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1526-1775: from AFRICA to AMERICA1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER1967-TODAY: from CRISIS, A SEARCH FOR MEANINGTODAY: The Journey Continues
1526-1775: from AFRICA to AMERICA Next Timeline
1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR
Timeline: 1526-1775
1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER1967-TODAY: from CRISIS, A SEARCH FOR MEANINGTODAY: The Journey Continues
1776-1865: from BONDAGE to HOLY WAR1866-1945: from EMANCIPATION to JIM CROW1946-1966: from CIVIL RIGHTS to BLACK POWER1967-TODAY: from CRISIS, A SEARCH FOR MEANINGTODAY: The Journey Continues




1526: FIRST NORTH AMERICAN SLAVE REVOLT Back to Journeyback to top

Nearly 40 years before the first permanent European settlement in North America, Spanish explorers bring enslaved Africans to what are now the Carolinas. The Africans escape in what is the first recorded slave revolt in North America.

1527: FIRST MUSLIM IN NORTH AMERICA Back to Journeyback to top

Estevan, the first identified Muslim in North America, lands in Florida as a Moroccan guide to the Spaniards. During the ensuing years of the slave trade, as many as 20% of West African slaves brought to North America are Muslim.

1619: FIRST AFRICANS IN ENGLISH COLONIES Back to Journeyback to top

Newly established English colonies in North America create a demand for laborers in the New World. At first, captured Africans are brought to the colonies as indentured servants. Once their term (3-7 years) is completed, indentured servants are allowed to live free, own land, and have indentured servants of their own. However, this system does not last long; indentured servitude gives way to lifetime slavery for Africans as the British colonies grow and the need for a permanent, inexpensive labor force increases.

1641: SLAVERY LEGALIZED Back to Journeyback to top

Notice of slave sale.

Massachusetts becomes the first British colony to legitimize slavery. Other states soon follow suit. Rights for free Africans are gradually restricted. By 1662, all children born to slave parents in Virginia are enslaved as well. Slavery has become a self-perpetuating system.

1701: DRIVE TO CONVERT SLAVES Back to Journeyback to top

An account of the Society of Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts

The English Crown charters the Society for Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts of the Anglican Church to convert slaves and Native Americans to Christianity. The drive to convert slaves is not welcomed by all slaveholders, however. Many are unwilling to allow their slaves to receive religious instruction, fearing that they will no longer be able to claim them as property once they are baptized. In 1705, Virginia passes a law that all laborers who "were not Christians in their Native Country... shall be slaves. A Negro, mulatto and Indian slaves ... shall be held to be real estate."

1738: BLACK CATHOLIC COMMUNITY ESTABLISHED Back to Journeyback to top

Map of Gracia Real de Santa Teresa de Mose

Santa Teresa de Mose is established in Florida as a town for freed slaves who have converted to Catholicism. It becomes the first free black town in North America.

1740: GREAT AWAKENING BEGINS Back to Journeyback to top

George Whitefield

The Great Awakening, a revitalization of religious expression, sweeps the British Colonies. The revival movement, unlike the earlier doctrine of the Puritans, promises the grace of God to all who experience a desire for it. Methodists and Baptists welcome African-Americans to join their ranks. Open-air preaching, and charismatic, passionate preachers attract throngs of participants.

1750s: RISE OF BLACK CONGREGATIONS Back to Journeyback to top

Small black congregations begin to emerge in the South. They are not necessarily affiliated with a church, but are instead informal gatherings held outdoors in "brush arbors." In the brush arbor both men and women are called by the spirit. Many of the male plantation preachers go on to found the first independent black churches - women remain itinerants.

1750: SLAVERY LEGAL IN ALL COLONIES Back to Journeyback to top

Georgia legalizes slavery. It is the last colony to do so.

1758: AFRICAN BAPTIST CHURCH FOUNDED Back to Journeyback to top

One of the first recorded black congregations is organized on the plantation of William Byrd in Mecklenburg, Virginia.

1773-1775: SILVER BLUFF BAPTISTS Back to Journeyback to top

Andrew Bryan

Plantation slave preacher George Liele, the first black Baptist in Georgia, founds the Silver Bluff Baptist Church in Silver Bluff, South Carolina. The congregation includes free and enslaved blacks. One of Liele's original followers, Andrew Bryan, goes on to become ordained by the Baptist Church in 1788, and founds the Bryan Street African Baptist Church, which is later renamed the First African Baptist Church of Savannah.

1773: PHILLIS WHEATLEY PUBLISHES POEMS Back to Journeyback to top

Cover page of Poems with drawing of Wheatley

Phillis Wheatley, a freed slave, publishes Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral. Wheatley's former owners, the Wheatleys of Boston, had provided Wheatley with an excellent education, rare for blacks and women at the time, and encouraged her to pursue writing.

1775: FIRST AMERICAN ANTISLAVERY SOCIETY FORMED Back to Journeyback to top

Medallion of Pennsylvania Abolitionist Society

Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, which later (1784) becomes known as the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery, is founded in Philadelphia. Quakers, who had abolished slavery among themselves nearly 20 years earlier, found the organization and revise its constitution to include a broader membership.

1775: AMERICAN REVOLUTION BEGINS Back to Journeyback to top

Receipt for service in Continental Army

The American Revolution, the war of independence from England, begins. Black soldiers fight for both the Loyalists - those loyal to England - and the Patriots. At least 5,000 black men serve in the Continental Army, and fight in key battles including Lexington, Concord, and Bunker Hill. British colonial governors try to incite slave rebellions and escapes by promising freedom to slaves who fight for the English Crown.

Back to Journey 1775: American Revolution Begins 1773: Phillis Wheatley Publishes Poems 1775: First American Antislavery Society Formed 1773-1775: Silver Bluff Baptists 1758: African Baptist Church Founded 1750: Slavery Legal in all Colonies 1750's: Rise of Black Congregations 1740: Great Awakening Begins 1527: First Muslim in North America 1641: Slavery Legalized 1738: Black Catholic Community Established 1701: Drive to Convert Slaves 1619: First Africans in English Colonies 1526: First North American Slave Revolt