Photo Gallery: Missouri Outlaws

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Find out about a few of the men Jesse James associated with, and learn where their bloody adventures ultimately led them.

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Known as "Bloody Bill," Anderson was the head of a notorious group of Missouri bushwhackers. He led a group of pro-Confederate guerrillas, including a young Jesse James, in a massacre of Union soldiers on September 27, 1864. He met his own end in an ambush a month later, at the age of 25.

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Some called Archie Clement the "head devil" of "Bloody Bill" Anderson's guerrilla gang. He took part in the vicious Centralia massacre of 1864. Clement was killed in 1866.

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The three Younger brothers became Jesse James' partners in crime after the Civil War. During an attempted robbery of a Northfield, Minnesota bank in 1876, all three Youngers were captured and put behind bars for life. Bob Younger (pictured) died in prison of tuberculosis in 1889.

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Along with his brothers Bob and Cole, Jim Younger was captured after the failed Northfield robbery and sentenced to life in prison. He was paroled after serving 25 years. Unable to get back on his feet, he committed suicide a year later, in 1902.

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Bob Ford (pictured) and his brother, Charlie, moved in with the Jameses in 1882. They waited for the right moment to kill the famous outlaw and claim a $10,000 reward. Bob pulled the trigger on April 3, 1882.

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Both Ford brothers, Bob and Charlie (pictured), were charged with James' murder, but were pardoned by Missouri governor Tom Crittenden.

|National Archives

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Since 1921, dozens of movies have featured a character based on Jesse James, depicting him in very different lights. Which portrayal do you think is the most historically accurate? Do you have a favorite?