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CHRONOLOGICAL: 1866 - 1900:

1866  |   1878  |   1887  |   1898

Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind

Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind (1887-1940)
The rise and fall of an African American leader who influenced politics and culture around the world.
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He was both a visionary and a manipulator, a brilliant orator and a pompous autocrat. In just ten years following his emigration to the United States as a laborer in 1917, Marcus Garvey rose to lead the largest black organization in history, was taken to prison in handcuffs, and was eventually deported. Marcus Garvey is the dramatic story of the rise and fall of an African American leader who influenced politics and culture around the world.

The Johnstown Flood (1889)
(no website available)
A small city in Pennsylvania is swept away in a wall of water over 30 feet high.
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By an abandoned earthen dam, at a mountain resort 14 miles up the valley, the leaders of industry and their families created an exclusive summer retreat. But the structure of the dam was fatally flawed. On May 31, 1889, after steady spring rains, it broke without warning, and this small city in Pennsylvania was swept away in a wall of water over 30 feet high. More than two thousand people lost their lives; thousands were left homeless.

Journey to America (1890-1920)
(no website available)
A tribute to the twelve million people who emigrated to the U.S. between 1890 and 1920.
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A tribute to the twelve million people who emigrated to the U.S. between 1890 and 1920. A recapturing of the journey through Europe to seaport towns, to the arrival in New York Harbor, and into the early months of settlement from urban ghettos out into the prairies. Letters, diaries and oral interviews are used to depict one of the largest single human migrations in history.
The Carter Family: Will the Circle Be Unbroken

The Carter Family: Will the Circle Be Unbroken (1891-1979)
The family whose songs and style remain the most copied and influential in American folk and country music.
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Their music solaced a nation during the darkest days of the depression. The words to their songs captured the painful and moving stories of poor America's history and proved that simple songs about ordinary people are as timeless, moving and relevant as the most studied classics in history. The Carter Family's songs and style remain the most copied in American folk and country music, influencing artists across all genres including Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, Emmylou Harris, Ray Charles, Linda Ronstadt and Sheryl Crow.The Carter Family: Will the Circle Be Unbroken explores the lives of A. P., Sara and Maybelle Carter, following their story through 1943, when they stopped playing and recording together. The film includes rarely-seen photographs, memorabilia, and archival footage that chronicles the life and music of the famous and influential trio.The Carters lived the poverty and heartbreak of the poor rural America they sang of, and, through music, brought a dignity and understanding to an often-misunderstood culture. Carter Family songs like "Wildwood Flower," "Will the Circle Be Unbroken" and "Worried Man Blues" laid the foundations for country, folk and bluegrass music.

If You Knew Sousa (1892-1935)
(no website available)
America's favorite bandmaster.
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John Phillip Sousa became America's favorite bandmaster, but band music wasn't Sousa's only passion. He was the first to bring the classics -- Verdi, Wagner, Puccini -- to a burgeoning American middle class. Wildly popular, his was the first large musical organization to go on tour and make music pay. He helped give birth to that great American institution, the small town marching band.

Mr. Sears' Catalogue (1893-1906)
(no website available)
A story of entrepreneurial triumph as well as an affectionate portrait of America from the 1890s through the 1920s.
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They started selling watches. Then Richard Sears and Alva Curtis Roebuck started a revolution -- a "wish book" that made life on the farm a little easier and put consumer goods within reach of every American. A story of entrepreneurial triumph as well as an affectionate portrait of America from the 1890s through the 1920s.

Indians, Outlaws, and Angie Debo (1893-1988)
(no website available)
Angie Debo uncovers a widespread conspiracy to cheat Native Americans of oil rich lands.
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As a child in 1899, Angie Debo was taken to Oklahoma in a covered wagon. She would become her state's most controversial historian -- her career threatened when she uncovered a cache of documents which proved a widespread conspiracy to cheat Native Americans out of oil-rich lands.
Kinsey

Kinsey (1894-2003)
He wrote the book on sex.
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Alfred Kinsey was a little-known biologist at Indiana University when, in the 1940s, he began compiling exhaustive data from tens of thousands of interviews about the sexual practices of men and women. The results of that research were the explosive, best-selling "Kinsey Reports." Implicit in the revolutionary study was a plea for greater tolerance. "Such terms as abnormal, unnatural, oversexed, and undersexed," wrote Harper's Magazine, "have little validity in the light of Professor Kinsey's revelations."

The man behind the inflammatory reports seemed at first glance an unlikely "revolutionary." Publicly, he was an erudite, tweedy academic, but in private Kinsey was far more complex. As his interest in sex research deepened, so did his wide-ranging sexual experimentation. Though his work was groundbreaking, and up-ended established ideas about sexual practices in America, his own sexual practices and personal beliefs almost certainly shaped and biased his findings.

Through interviews with his research assistants, his children, people who took his sex questionnaire, his biographers, and intellectual historians, this probing documentary assesses Kinsey's remarkable achievements, while examining how his personal life shaped his career.

Minik, the Lost Eskimo

Minik, the Lost Eskimo (1897-1918)
In 1897, Arctic explorer Robert Peary caused a sensation when he returned from Greenland with five Eskimos. Within months, four of the Eskimos had died, leaving a seven-year-old boy named Minik alone in a foreign land.
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In April 1897, six polar Eskimos arrived in New York City. Far removed from the home they had known in Greenland, where their Inuit community numbered just 234 people, they found themselves in the heart of a teeming metropolis. The youngest of the band was seven-year-old Minik, who remembered his first impression of the city as "a land we thought must be heaven."
CHRONOLOGICAL: 1866 - 1900:

1866  |   1878  |   1887  |   1898

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