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CHRONOLOGICAL: 1926 - 1945:

1926  |   1930  |   1938  |   1941

The Hurricane of '38

The Hurricane of '38 (1938)
No one had ever seen a storm like this.
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As the storm made its way across the Atlantic and up the eastern seaboard, there was little warning. Radar had not been invented. The National Weather Bureau predicted it would blow itself out at North Carolina, but it didn't. No one had ever seen a storm like this. Rhode Island fishermen, residents and vacationers recount what it was like to live through one of the greatest natural disasters recorded in North America.

Forbidden City, USA (1938-1960)
(no website available)
Chinese Americans defy cultural tradition to pursue their passion for American music and dance.
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Before WWII, San Francisco's Chinatown was a separate world, closed to outsiders, ruled by rigid homeland customs. But in the 1930s, second generation Chinese Americans defied cultural tradition to pursue their passion for American music and dance. They started careers as "Chinese Fred Astaires" and "Chinese Frank Sinatras" in one of the city's famous Chinatown night clubs, Forbidden City.

Orphans of the Storm (1940)
(no website available)
In the summer of 1940, 10,000 British children were sent on a perilous sea voyage to safe havens in the United States.
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In the summer of 1940, as the German Luftwaffe began its assault on England, 10,000 British children were sent on a perilous sea voyage to safe havens in the United States. There, they forged life-long relationships with their "adopted" families, relationships that changes lives and attitudes on both sides of the Atlantic.
Fly Girls

Fly Girls (1940-1944)
During WWII more than a thousand women signed up to fly with the U.S. military.
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During WWII, more than a thousand women signed up to fly with the U.S. military. Wives, mothers, actresses and debutantes who joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS) test-piloted aircraft, ferried planes and logged 60 million miles in the air. Thirty-eight women died in service. But the opportunity to play a critical role in the war effort was abruptly canceled by politics and resentment, and it would be 30 years before women would again break the sex barrier in the skies.

Eric Sevareid's Not So Wild A Dream (1940-1945)
(no website available)
Based on Sevareid's best-selling book of the same title.
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A touching memoir beginning with life in a small Minnesota town and taking us through a young man's early days as pacifist. Reporting on the rise of fascism in Europe, Sevareid, as a young CBS reporter, would change his belief. Based on Sevareid's best-selling book of the same title.

The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter (1940-1945)
(no website available)
A look at five real-life "Rosies" and the reality of working in the defense plants during WWII.
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An original look through newsreels, war department films, posters and interviews with five, real-life "Rosies" about the reality of working in the defense plants during WWII, and their reactions to having to give up those jobs for returning GIs.

A Family Gathering (1940-1950)
(no website available)
The personal journey of three generations of a Japanese American family.
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The personal journey of three generations of a Japanese American family. Settling in the 1900s in Hood River, Oregon, the Yasui family became respectable figures in the valley community. Yet in December, 1941, they were considered "potentially dangerous" enemy aliens and sent to internment camps. After the war, they would struggle to reclaim their place as patriotic Americans.
CHRONOLOGICAL: 1926 - 1945:

1926  |   1930  |   1938  |   1941

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