Ringside Radio
The First Match The Rematch June 22, 1938 | Yankee Stadium, New York
Fight Preview Round 1

Preview

Clem McCarthy reports from Schmeling and Louis' weigh-in. (9:57)

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Audio recordings of the Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling boxing matches are the copyrighted material of Cayton Sports, Inc. and are provided courtesy of Cayton Sports, Inc.

Outside Yankee Stadium

Audio Transcript

Clem McCarthy:
Good afternoon sports fans of the United States and Canada, or good morning sports fans in case you are listening from way out there on the Pacific coast. Clem McCarthy here in Madison Square Garden, New York, for the weighing-in ceremonies for this real battle of the century, perhaps the battle of the million. Right now, promoter Mike Jacobs of the Twentieth Century Sporting Club, is predicting a gross gate of more than a million dollars. And if that proves fact, this will be the seventh million-dollar fight in the history of boxing. Jack Dempsey took part in five... in four of the seven, I'll make that five, five of the seven. His two fights with Gene Tunney, his fight with George Carpentier, with Louie Firpo and with Jack Sharkey. After that came the Baer and Louis fight, three years ago. This then will be the seventh fight if it surpasses a million dollars, and indications are right now, that it will. A tremendous gathering of sports writers, news photographers, news reelmen, boxing authorities, veterans of the boxing game, from every part of the United States and Canada are here. Looking all around if I attempted to mention any of the faces, I would never get off the air in this ten minutes because all the boys are here. They've come from far and wide to see this fight. It is the real battle of these modern times. In a few moments we are expecting Max Schmeling and Joe Louis to step on the scales and be weighed. Our time being limited, we may be denied that privilege of seeing them weighed in, because modern day traffic conditions sometimes upset the best of plans. Both men started early enough and have done their best to get here. Outside Madison Square Garden, a squadron of police is holding back the crowd, the sidewalks are roped off, and unless you have a permit to get into Madison Square Garden, you cannot get through those police lines. And besides the mounted police are there to support the police on the sidewalks. Such is the interest in this tremendous boxing match that will take place tonight in Yankee Stadium, here in New York. And incidentally, while I have the opportunity, I want to caution radio listeners, and particularly fight fans that the National Broadcasting Company suggests you keep turned to your NBC station this evening for the Louis/Schmeling bout. The State Athletic Commission has the power to start the fight earlier than ten o'clock, much earlier if necessary. Ten o'clock Eastern Daylight Savings time, if the weather should threaten. Right now the weather is cloudy, and some are looking forward to showers. If they don't materialize, then undoubtedly the fight will start at ten o'clock Eastern Daylight Savings time. On the other hand if there should be occasional showers, or if in the middle of the evening, real threatening weather comes up, the bout may be moved forward much earlier than ten o'clock Eastern Daylight time. The New York Weather bureau, at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Savings time, announced the forecast as follows: partly cloudy, continued warm and occasional showers tonight and probably Thursday. So if you would hear this fight tonight, which I know that every boxing fan in the world wants to hear, then tune your radio into NBC early and stay until the finish of the fight. And while I have the opportunity, waiting for Max Schmeling and Joe Louis to step in here and be weighed, I want to take advantage of a moment and have one of New York state's boxing commissioners speak on the radio -- D. Walker Wear of Binghamton, New York. Mr. Wear.

D. Walker Wear:
I'm very happy to say a few words to the sports fans throughout the United States. We're evidently waiting with interest the outcome of tonight's bout. New York has never seen such a crowd as is assembled here at this time. The hotels are packed, and even in the streets, the conversation is all about the fight. In Madison Square Garden, as the announcer has probably told you is assembled one of the greatest galleries of sports writers, fans and followers that the world has ever seen. After tonight's bout, we will all know better what's going to happen to boxing in the United States. I thank you.

Clem McCarthy:
Thank you, Mr. Wear. You have just listened to D. Walker Wear of the New York State Boxing Commission. The New York State Commission has done great things for the sport of boxing, not only in New York state and New York City, but its influence has been felt throughout the world. The three commissioners being John B. Phelan, the chairman, William Brown and D. Walker Wear. Dr. Walker, no relation to D. Walker Wear, Dr. Walker, the official, the New York State Boxing commission's physician, is now examining Schmeling and Louis, but Louis... I should say examining Schmeling. Joe Louis has not yet arrived and so I fear we will not be able to see the two boys weigh in. For your information, the promise is from all the newspaper writers who have been up to the two camps, the prediction is, that Joe Louis will weigh very close to 200, a few ounces either side and that Max Schmeling will step on the scales at 196. Both men from their training camps have expressed unlimited, unstinted confidence in their ability to win the fight. Louis' favored prediction has been in two rounds, if Schmeling stands up and makes a fight of it. If on the other hand, Schmeling backs away from Louis' attack, then Louis admits that he will have to go much farther than two rounds to wear him down. That's Louis' side. Schmeling's side is that he is as good a fighter as he ever was, and possibly better, that he has learned more, and that he is in the peak condition of his life. That's reasonable to expect because the man has had three tune up fights within the last year for this event. He is not coming out stale for this one. And that has happened in the cases of men of Schmeling's age in the past. They've been idle from the ring for over a year and then suddenly had to step in and put up the fight of their lives. Schmeling is well tuned up. As these minutes go by here and we are losing time, I am more confident than ever that we will not get to see the two fighters weighed in. Well, if you will read your local papers this afternoon, you will have no difficulty in learning the weights of the men long before they step into the ring tonight. The fight will take place in Yankee Stadium, here in New York, which has been the scene of some of the greatest battles of heavy [ring] history, in fact of any class, heavyweight or lightweight. I am going to step right over here while I have the opportunity before I'll be in the way of the newsreel photographers and the cameramen. There's a tremendous battery of them here as there always is on an event of this kind. And I'm going to pick off one of the first sportswriters that I happen to see. I don't care who it may be. Here's Ed Van Ivory. Ed, have you any prediction to make on the outcome of this fight?

Ed Van Ivory:
I like Louis' chances very much.

Clem McCarthy:
You like Louis this time?

Clem McCarthy:
And here is another authority of the boxing game, Nat Fleischer, author and publisher of many of the greatest books on boxing. Nat, have you an opinion tonight?

Nat Fleischer:
Clem, I still stick by my guns with Louis, to win by a knockout within seven rounds.

Clem McCarthy:
Well, you're out on a limb, my boy. My old friend, Hype Igoe. I hope California is listening, to say nothing of New York and [way] points. Hype, will you kindly step real close to the radio and express your opinion on this fight.

Hype Igoe:
I think Joe will knock him out inside of five rounds.

Clem McCarthy:
That Joe Louis will knock out Schmeling inside of five rounds.

Hype Igoe:
Yeah. I think it's a different Louis and he is hitting harder and he's learned how to get under right hands.

Clem McCarthy:
Well now, Hype, let me tell you something, I've known many a boxing writer and sports authority to go out on a limb on a fight, but the other day Boris Jenkins had a marvelous cartoon of you jumping off a spring board. You weren't out on a limb, you were going right out into a great big pool. If you're wrong, I don't know how you're going to swim out. Now then I want to get over here and see if I can catch a few more of the boys. Where's that Murray Lewin, I saw him. Well, Murray Lewin, let's have your opinion on the fight.

Murray Lewin:
I still think it's Louis by a knockout within seven. It'll be a great fight though while it lasts, Clem.

Clem McCarthy:
Win, lose or draw for anybody, it'll be a great fight. And come in here Sid [Morser] real quick while I got a change, those Hollywooders out there who know your daughter so well will want to know from you, what's your opinion?

Sid [Morser]:
I think that Louis should win within four rounds and then after that I like Schmeling.

Clem McCarthy:
Hmmm, well you're playing fairly safe... and uh, some of these boys I can't identify here, I want to catch them as quick as I can. As soon as I know who I'm talking to, I've got to get my man. Over here is another man, Henry [Rosenlan] of the Daily Express. What is your opinion? Oh what Daily Express?

Henry [Rosenlan]:
London.

Clem McCarthy:
London, oh well, how do you do? London Daily Express. What's your opinion on this fight?

Henry [Rosenlan]:
I think that if Schmeling stands up and makes a fight of it, Louis will knock him over within four rounds.

Clem McCarthy:
In four? Say, I think I'll get one of my assistants here to step out, and see if I can get a hold of, write it out anything I can, answer questions on the radio. And, I want to see if I can get somebody that think Schmeling will win within three or four rounds. Write it out, work fast, the time is drawing to a close, this is radio and not the Pony Express. I want to get some more of these boxing boys. Where's that [Caz] Adams if I can see him or Jimmy Dawson. Here's an old friend of mine, Harold... Harold... Harold Conrad, come right up here and let me know, what is your opinion of this fight?

Harold Conrad:
Well, I went down with Joe last time. If he goes down this time I will be with him again. In six rounds.

Clem McCarthy:
You'll be with him once more. Here is one more chance, Commissioner Frank Wilmer, and what is your opinion?

Frank Wilmer:
I think that Schmeling will overcome Louis' punch.

Clem McCarthy:
Schmeling will overcome, I see.

Frank Wilmer:
And will win this bout.

Clem McCarthy:
Good, well, now then our time is drawing right to a close, and so I want to say to you that not forget to tune into your radio early and on account of the weather, we may have to put the fight on way ahead of ten o'clock Eastern Daylight Savings Time, because of possible showers. And now Clem McCarthy speaking and returning you to the Farm and Home Hour in Washington D.C.