Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Rollover text informationAmerican Experience Logo
Marcus Garvey: Look For Me in the Whirlwind











spacer above content
Primary Sources: A Barefaced Colored Leader

A Barefaced Colored Leader
by Marcus Garvey

W. E. B. Du Bois is the most brazen fellow that one knows in Negro leadership. Because of the unfortunate mental condition of the masses of Negroes, this man, who secured many free scholarships to obtain his education, has consistently used his "white" education to mislead and humbug, the millions of his race in the United States.

The Negroes in America, since Emancipation, have ever been looking for honest and upright leaders to point them to the way of political, economic, social and general development. Du Bois offered himself immediately after he left Harvard and the people were glad to receive him, but jealous as he was of every other Negro leader, his first effort was to attack the honest, upright and useful leader -- Booker T. Washington. By so doing he divided American Negro opinion and the confusion springing there from has continued up to the present, but Du Bois took pride and pleasure not only in attacking Booker Washington but he has attacked and tried to discredit every one other Negro leader of importance who sprung up in America.

The history of the struggle of the American Negro upward will record that Du Bois was one of the greatest enemies of the greatest industrial, political, commercial and nationalistic movements that was ever founded in the United States. He never rested openly and by intrigue to discredit and destroy this movement until he had along with others succeeded in having its leader "framed up" and imprisoned and then deported from the United States. After he succeeded in killing that movement in the United States and having the field almost entirely to himself, as no doubt he intended, he kept the race without a programme and up to recently he and Kelly Miller have been debating as to what kind of a programme would be best suited to the American Negro at this late hour of his national distress.

The very fact that the man up to now has no programme shows that he never intended any and his profession of being a leader from the time he left Harvard, was only to deceive the American Negro and at the same time satisfy his white patrons who had the scheme to suppress any independent development of his race.



Site Navigation

The Film & More: Film Description | Transcript | Primary Sources | Further Reading

Marcus Garvey: Look For Me in the Whirlwind Home | The Film & More | Special Features | Timeline | Maps | People & Events | Teacher's Guide

American Experience | Feedback | Search & Site Map | Shop | Subscribe | Web Credits

© New content 1999-2000 PBS Online / WGBH

Exclusive Corporate Funding is provided by: