Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
Hijacked
Teacher's Guide: Hints for the Active Learning Questions

History

  1. Groups should consider how the various actors in the crisis, including the hijackers and hostages and the governments of the United States, Jordan, Israel, the Soviet Union, and European countries, might have acted differently. They also should consider what might have happened if, for example, the hijackers had not succeeded in gaining control of the planes, or if bad weather or other factors had prevented the planes from landing in Jordan.

  2. Extensive information on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be found at this special Frontline Web site.

Economics

  1. Information on the Pueblo incident, the Iranian hostage crisis, and the "arms for hostages" deal with Iran during the 1980s can be found at these PBS Web sites.

  2. You might want to introduce this activity by reading students a portion of President Bush's 2006 State of the Union address, in which he declared that "America is addicted to oil, which is often imported from unstable parts of the world" and established the national goal of "replac[ing] more than 75 percent of our oil imports from the Middle East by 2025."

Geography

  1. Updated information on the Palestinian-Israeli issue, including Israel's withdrawal from the Gaza Strip in 2005, can be found at this special Web page from the Online NewsHour.

  2. For example, you might express distances by comparing them to the distance between your community and another community, and you might express areas by comparing them to counties in your area.

Civics

  1. Information on defining terrorism can be found at Web sites operated by the U.S. government, the United Nations, and other organizations. If students are having difficulty comparing the P.F.L.P. and 9/11 terrorist actions, you might ask them to consider such questions as whether the fact that no hostages died during the P.F.L.P. hijackings makes them less wrong.

  2. To help students think about this issue, you might ask them how they would respond if they were reporters and had an opportunity to attend a press conference held by Osama bin Laden.

back to top page created on 2.14.06

 
Hijacked American Experience
THE FILM & MORE | SPECIAL FEATURE | TIMELINE | MAPS | PEOPLE & EVENTS | TEACHER'S GUIDE