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A Midwife's Tale












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%When she turned 50, in 1785, Martha Ballard began writing a diary. She kept it faithfully for the next twenty-seven years, amassing nearly 10,000 entries. Without the diary, writes historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, "we would not even be certain she had been a midwife." But with the diary, we have a rich record of Martha's days in Hallowell, Maine, her work as a midwife and healer, and the social environment in which she lived.

Historians rely on documents like diaries, which describe individual experiences, to help them put together a picture of the past. The records we leave behind will help our descendents understand us and life in our times.

 

Do you have any diaries or other family records that have helped you learn about your family's past?

 

Yes

No

 

Have you ever kept a journal or diary of your own life?

 

Yes

No

 

 

Did you watch the film, "A Midwife's Tale"? (Please vote "yes" if you watched at least half of the film.)

 

Yes

No

 

If yes, did it influence your answers?

 

Yes

No



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