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Alex Beam
Journalist Alex Beam worked at Newsweek and Business Week before joining the Boston Globe. His award-winning twice-weekly column for the Globe has appeared since 1987. In addition to his journalistic work, Beam is the author of two novels about Russia, Fellow Travelers (1987) and The Russians Are Coming! (1991), both published by St. Martin's Press. His recent non-fiction book exploring the history of McLean Hospital, Gracefully Insane: The Rise and Fall of America's Premier Mental Hospital, was published in January 2002.


Alex Beam

Laurie Flynn
On January 1, 2001, Laurie Flynn joined the Columbia University Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, working to improve services for children and adolescents with serious mental disorders. For the past 16 years, Ms. Flynn has served as the executive director of NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill). NAMI is the nation's leading grassroots advocacy organization dedicated solely to improving the quality of life for people with severe mental illnesses and their families. Ms. Flynn is a member of many national advisory boards and professional association committees concerned with the care of the severely mentally ill, the quality of mental health care and family support, as well as research and ethical aspects of the treatment of mental illness. She is also the recipient of many service awards and commendations from national foundations and associations, including three from the American Psychiatric Association. Ms. Flynn is the author of articles, books, and book chapters on health services for the mentally ill and family support. She has a daughter with a serious mental illness.


Laurie Flynn

Frederick J. Frese III, Ph.D.
Dr. Frese is a psychologist with thirty years' experience in public mental health care and is presently coordinator of the Summit County Recovery Project, serving recovering consumers in the Akron area. For fifteen years, until his retirement in 1995, Fred was director of psychology at Western Reserve Psychiatric Hospital. He is also a consumer, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia as a young Marine Corps officer. Despite his disability, he was able to gain a degree from the American Graduate School of International Management in Phoenix, Arizona; and a doctorate in psychology from Ohio University. Fred founded the Community and State Hospital Section of the American Psychological Association and is past president of the National Mental Health Consumers' Association. He currently holds clinical faculty appointments in psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University and at the Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine. He is first vice president of the board of directors of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, and is also on the board of scientific advisors for Schizophrenia Bulletin. He has authored many articles and book chapters and has lectured widely on the subject of schizophrenia.


Frederick J. Frese III, Ph.D.

Irving I. Gottesman, Ph.D.
Professor Gottesman currently holds an endowed chair in adult psychiatry and is a Senior Fellow in psychology at the University of Minnesota, as well as an emeritus chair in psychology at the University of Virginia. His distinguished career includes plaudits from British, Japanese and American professional associations, including the Joseph Zubin Award for lifetime contributions to psychopathology from the Society for Research in Psychopathology. W. H. Freeman published his award-winning 1991 book, Schizophrenia Genesis -- The Origins of Madness, which has been translated into Japanese and German. His more recent work focuses on psychiatric genetics and genomics. Prof. Gottesman has mentored 35 Ph.D. students, and an annual lecture on behavior and neurogenetics has been endowed in his name at Virginia.


Irving I. Gottesman

Raquel E. Gur, M.D., Ph.D.
Dr. Gur is a professor of psychiatry, neurology and radiology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her academic career has been devoted to the study of brain function in schizophrenia. Dr. Gur has directed Penn's Neuropsychiatry Section and Schizophrenia Research Center, and has established an interdisciplinary program dedicated to advancing the understanding of the pathophysiology of this complex disorder through the application of diverse strategies, from neurobehavioral to molecular. The research has been supported by the NIMH, including a Mental Health Clinical Research Center, a MERIT Award, a Senior Scientist Award, a Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders, and a training grant. Over the years, the research findings have been presented in professional meetings and published in leading scientific journals. This work has been carried out in large and well characterized samples of research participants, with commitment to advance knowledge while meeting patient care needs.


Raquel E. Gur, M.D., Ph.D.

John Hsiao, M.D.
Dr. Hsiao completed a residency in psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a residency in nuclear medicine at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center. After many years as a researcher in the Division of Intramural Research of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), he moved to the extramural research program. He is currently chief of the Special Projects Program in the Division of Services and Intervention Research, and editor in chief of Schizophrenia Bulletin. He is Project Officer for the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) project: two multi-site, multi-year clinical trials comparing new antipsychotics, one in schizophrenia, and the other in Alzheimer's disease.


John Hsiao, M.D.

E. Fuller Torrey, M.D.
Dr. Torrey is the executive director of the Stanley Medical Research Institute, president of the Treatment Advocacy Center, and a professor of psychiatry at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. He has authored or co-authored 18 books, including Surviving Schizophrenia: A Manual for Families, Consumers, and Providers (4th edition published in 2001) and, with co-author Judy Miller, The Invisible Plague: The Rise of Mental Illness from 1750 to the Present (Rutgers University Press, 2002).


E. Fuller Torrey, M.D.

Robert Whitaker
Journalist Robert Whitaker's articles on the mentally ill and the drug industry have won several awards, including the George Polk Award for medical writing and the National Association of Science Writers' Award for best magazine article. He was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for a Boston Globe series on harmful research involving the mentally ill that he co-wrote in 1998 -- a series which led him to write Mad in America: Bad Science, Bad Medicine, and the Enduring Mistreatment of the Mentally Ill (Perseus Publishing, 2002). Whitaker lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Robert Whitaker


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