Skip PBS navigation bar, and jump to content.
Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS

spacer above content
Online Poll

The 21 defendants sit and listen to testimony during the trial at Nuremberg When the Allies first began to debate the post-war treatment of Nazis, the British government favored shooting Axis leaders as outlaws, without any attempt to convict individuals of specific crimes. During the war, the British foreign secretary, Anthony Eden, had said, "the guilt of such individuals is so black that they fall outside ... any judicial process."

The Soviet and American governments agreed that the Nazis had committed unforgivable crimes, but felt that the accused should be convicted in a public trial.

At Nuremberg, this public trial took place, but with Allied crimes barred from prosecution and defendants charged with crimes that were only defined after the fact, the trials at Nuremberg were criticized by some as "victor's justice."

Under these circumstances, do you think the trial process at Nuremberg was fair?

 

Yes

No

 
 
Did you watch the film, "The Nuremberg Trials"?
(Please vote "yes" if you watched at least half of the film.)
 

Yes

No

 

If yes, did it influence your answers?

 

Yes

No


I do not wish to vote but would like to see the current results

page created on 01.03.06 back to top
Site Navigation


The Nuremberg Trials American Experience

Exclusive Corporate Funding is provided by: