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Teacher's Guide: Hints for the Active Learning Questions

Civics

  1. You may choose instead to have students present their statements to the class and explain why they found them persuasive.

  2. You may want to have the teacher or a student volunteer "facilitate" the conversation by asking a series of questions for the interviewees to address. For example, you might begin by asking whether the events of 1967 caused the interviewees to begin questioning authority.

History

  1. Students can find relevant information from almanacs or timelines (print or electronic), newspaper archives, histories and memoirs of the period, and other sources.

  2. Students can find relevant information from almanacs or timelines (print or electronic), newspaper archives, histories and memoirs of the period, and other sources.

Economics

  1. Groups may want to begin addressing these questions by putting them in hypothetical present-day contexts. For example, would you approve the use of napalm against a terrorist training camp? Would it be appropriate for a college to prevent a company that has been accused of operating sweatshops in developing countries from recruiting on campus?

  2. One good source of historical data is the Census Bureau's Statistical Abstracts page.

Geography

  1. Students will be able to obtain some of the needed information from this Web site's timeline and from the timelines on the companion American Experience Web site for the landmark television series, Vietnam: A Television History.

  2. Some of these locations are listed in the timeline and shown in the maps on the companion American Experience Web site for the landmark television series, Vietnam: A Television History.

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