After the Mayflower

On location at Pioneer Village in Salem, MA, director Chris Eyre poses with two period reenactors and a heritage breed chicken. Pioneer Village is a living history site that portrays Salem in 1630, but for WE SHALL REMAIN, the property was used as a stand-in for Plymouth colony.

— Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Troy Philips, who portrays Tisquantum, checks his voicemail while Christian Hopkins and Jerry Wolf Duff Sellers, two of Massasoit’s warriors, relax between takes. When they are not acting, Philips is the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for Western MA, Hopkins is a high school student and champion dancer, and Wolf Duff Sellers is a student at Brown University in Providence, RI.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Language consultant David White reviews lines in the Nipmuc language with Marcos Akiaten, who plays the Wampanoag leader Massasoit. White consulted with the producers when they were writing the script and later translated lines into Nipmuc for Akiaten and the other actors.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Members of the hair and wardrobe departments make final adjustments to the signature wampum headpiece that Massasoit (Marcos Akiaten) wears. Wampum, crafted from quahog shells found along the New England coast, has a deep spiritual and cultural meaning to the Algonquin tribes of New England. European colonizers, when they observed how much Native people valued wampum, mistakenly believed the tribes used it as a form of money.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

It takes a village to make a film. In the foreground, Edward Winslow (Nicholas Irons) welcomes Massasoit (Marcos Akiaten) to Plymouth for the first Thanksgiving. Overseeing the scene are: Nipmuc language consultant David White, director Chris Eyre, Native cultural consultant Cassius Spears, English cultural consultant Emerson Baker and executive producer Sharon Grimberg. More than half a dozen consultants worked with the production team to ensure accuracy for both the Native and English representations of 17th century culture.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Language consultant David White reviews lines in the Nipmuc language with Marcos Akiaten, who plays the Wampanoag leader Massasoit. White consulted with the producers when they were writing the script and later translated lines into Nipmuc for Akiaten and the other actors.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Executive producer Sharon Grimberg and director of photography Paul Goldsmith discuss the next scene at Pioneer Village in Salem, MA. All dramatic recreations were shot on super 16mm film to create a rich look for the series.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Director Chris Eyre directs a dramatic recreation of the first Thanksgiving at Pioneer Village in Salem, MA. In the historical record, there are only two sentences written about the first Thanksgiving, so the producers relied on the guidance of colonial historians to create a feast that included foods the Pilgrims would have eaten in 1621.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Nipmuc language consultant David White dons period wardrobe to portray one of King Philip’s warriors in Marshfield, MA.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Director Chris Eyre discusses a scene with actor Annawon Weeden, who plays King Philip. Weeden, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, is an educator in his community and is a traditional singer and dancer.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Costumer Grace Muron makes adjustments to William Elk’s breechcloth. The wardrobe for Massasoit’s warriors, representing the early 1600s, consisted mainly of deer skin and furs. To show how trade with the Europeans impacted the Native wardrobe over the course of the 17th century, the costume department integrated more woven cloth into the wardrobe for King Philip’s warriors, representing the tribe almost half a century later.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Annawon Weeden (King Philip) and Mark Cartier (John Easton) rehearse their lines for a key scene. Dialogue for this scene comes from “A Relation Of The Indian War,” John Easton’s 1675 account of a meeting with King Philip.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Director Chris Eyre and Mark Cartier (John Easton) rehearse a key scene. Dialogue for this scene comes from “A Relation Of The Indian War,” John Easton’s 1675 account of a meeting with King Philip.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Native reenactors paddling a traditional dugout canoe on a bend of the North River in Marshfield, MA. Many people associate Native people with birchbark canoes, but the Wampanoag used fire to hollow out massive tree trunks to build their canoes.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Annawon Weeden, who portrays King Philip, in a traditional dugout canoe on the North River in Marshfield, MA. Weeden, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, is an educator in his community and is a traditional singer and dancer.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell
After the Mayflower

Native Consultant Cassius Spears Sr. and one of Philip’s warriors, played by Ginew Benton, watch as a scene is shot. Spears consulted with the production team on material culture such as the construction of wetus. He also led a day of canoe instruction and consulted with the hair, makeup and wardrobe departments. Here you see Philip’s warrior wearing woven woolen cloth, showing the impact of European trade on native dress in late 1600’s.

-Photo Credit: Webb Chappell

Find out about We Shall Remain events organized by your local PBS station, community coalition, public library or tribal community college.

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