Geronimo

Michael Chin, the director of photography, prepares to shoot galloping horses. Producer Dustinn Craig, not pictured, is also preparing to shoot using a second camera. The production team had two cameras rolling that day because the horse wrangler, Colter Moore, warned the team would only have one shot: once the horses passed, they would head straight back to the barn, and it would be nearly impossible to get them going again.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Kraig Craig, producer Dustinn Craig’s son, is fitted with his breech cloth for the first scene of the recreation shoot. The costume designer, Maggie McFarland, struggled to get the children's breech cloths to stay in place when they ran.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

February in Arizona is very cold, and the boys had to run shirtless! The four boys huddled in a mini-van with the heat blasting in-between takes.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Associate producer Michael Rossi, producer Sarah Colt and producer Dustinn Craig discuss an upcoming scene. Each member of the small team did a number of different jobs, including directing, drawing storyboards, mapping out shots, and coordinating the production.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Associate producer Michael Rossi and assistant cameraman Paul Marbury survey the rigging of a dolly track, one of the many set-ups used to film the Apache boys running. The dolly track allows the camera to travel smoothly while capturing the action.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Producer Dustinn Craig and director of photography Michael Chin discuss a scene in which the camera is rigged under the wagon. In order to see what the camera was filming, the crew set up a video tap, which displays the image on a monitor. Craig and Chin sat in the wagon as it bounced along, covering themselves with an old blanket because it was impossible to see the monitor in the bright sunlight.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Daniel Standing, a member of the White Mountain Apache Tribe from Whiteriver, Arizona, poses in his role portraying a White Mountain Apache Scout.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

Clouds rolled through and blocked the sun causing delays on this shoot day. With limited time before the sun went down, the team grabbed this shot even though it wasn’t executed exactly as planned.

-Photo Credit: Mihio Manus
Geronimo

This dance was filmed in the Chiricahua Mountains. It was significant to the dancers, Chiricahua people from the Mescalero Reservation in New Mexico, to dance on their ancestral land. Traditionally, the dance would have taken place before conflicts, but the Chiricahua did not consider it a war dance. The term “war” is not part of the Apache terminology, and the dance was intended as a prayer for the protection of Apache people who risked their lives for their families.

-Photo Credit: Michael Chin

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