Tecumseh's Vision

Director Ric Burns consults with the production team on a sweltering July day in Indiana. The crew is sitting atop a grassy hill at Prophetstown readying for a scene in which Tecumseh calls other Shawnee villages together to join in his movement.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

Tribal Elder George Blanchard of the Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma schools the actors in the stomp dance, a social dance traditionally performed by tribal peoples of the Eastern and Southeastern United States.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

After a tutorial from the cultural consultant George Blanchard and his family, actors came together to re-enact a traditional Shawnee stomp dance. While many of the Native American actors who took part in the production are trained dancers and performers, most had never taken part in a stomp dance.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

Michael Greyeyes as Tecumseh leads his warriors into the Battle of the Thames. Greyeyes, a Cree actor from Canada has portrayed Native people of various backgrounds. “What has helped me are the cultural advisors from the communities,” says Greyeyes. “Language coaches, dialect coaches, people who have an intimate knowledge of that community make it possible for actors like myself to bring something authentic to what we do.”

-Photo Credit: Lauren Prestileo
Tecumseh's Vision

Director Chris Eyre directing Tecumseh's recruitment trip. The production team made three trips to Indiana to shoot re-enactments for the film.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

Michael Greyeyes dressed as Tecumseh gets some last-minute notes from director Ric Burns prior to shooting. “We’re filming in Indiana and Prophetstown, where these events occurred. There’s a sense of history about it,” said Greyeyes when interviewed on set. “Coming here is essential for us to do our best.”

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

First assistant director Matthew Campbell consults with directors Ric Burns and Chris Eyre in the longhouse at Historic Prophetstown in Indiana. In the early 1800’s, Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa settled in Prophetstown, which became the epicenter of their spiritual and political movement.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

Director Ric Burns and Shawnee language and cultural consultant George Blanchard discuss ideas to incorporate Shawnee culture in the film. Here, they are reviewing the set depicting a Shawnee village, which incorporated two wikiups, traditional dwellings of the Shawnee people.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus
Tecumseh's Vision

Actors on the set of Tecumseh's Vision prepare for a scene in which villagers greet Shawnee men returning from a hunt. White settlement forced the Shawnee to replace hunting, their traditional means of gathering food, with farming, an unfamiliar method. Actor Muriel Belanger, right, portrays Tecumseh and Tenskwatawa's mother.

-Photo Credit: Larry Gus

Find out about We Shall Remain events organized by your local PBS station, community coalition, public library or tribal community college.

Explore the Map
Exclusive Corporate
Funding Provided by:
Liberty Mutual Insurance
Major Funding by:
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
Additional Funding
Provided by:
American Experience