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BUILDING BIG
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The Educators Guide
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__ Doing Hands-On Science With Kids

Hands-on activities motivate kids to learn by actively involving them in the process of science. Kids become invested in activities when they generate the questions and help design the experiments to answer them. Here are some other reasons to do hands-on science:  

Show kids that science is a process they use every day.  
Engaging kids in the process of science teaches them that science is a way of thinking about the world, a particular way of asking questions and looking for answers. Kids learn that everyone can be a scientist. For example, point out everyday examples of asking questions, making observations, and drawing conclusionsósuch as deciding what to wear by looking out the window and checking the weather forecast. 

Take advantage of kids' interests.  
Involving kids' hands, senses, and even whole bodies in learning addresses their diverse learning styles: Some kids learn best when information is presented verbally, others visually, others physically, and so on.  

You probably know that getting a group of 10- to 13-year-olds to sit still for half an hour can seem like a bigger challenge than building a bridge over the Grand Canyon. Instead, take advantage of kidsí restlessness by giving their hands something to do. Kids this age are also developing their social skills. Working in small groups gives them permission to talk and interact, while helping them to develop teamwork skills they will need in the workplace and throughout their lives. 

Survival Tips for Activity Leaders:  
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