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Online Course for Teachers: Teaching Evolution

About this Course 

SESSION 7

SESSION 7: How Can You Use Active Learning to Teach Evolution?

Explain Part A: Questioning

As teachers facilitate student learning in inquiry-based science, they use questions to promote inquiry. Teachers ask questions for a variety of reasons: to get students' attention, to assess understanding and knowledge, and to establish connections to prior lessons. Read about using questions to promote inquiry.

Watch these Evolution Case Study video segments to explore the use of questioning by Ms. Chen, Mr. Bingman, and Ms. Havlik. Then answer the questions that follow in the space below.

Image from Bonnie Chen's class.  Image from Ken Bingman's class.

Chen: Bird Beaks
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Bingman: Are Humans
Still Evolving?

View in:
QuickTime | Real Player

Image of Marilyn Havlik

Havlik: Sickle Cell
View in:
QuickTime | Real Player

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In what ways do these teachers use questioning?

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What levels of questions do they use?

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Give examples of questions used to assist student thinking, challenge student explanations, and suggest further study.

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Was the sequence of questions significant? Explain.

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What kinds of questions do students generate?

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What examples of student-to-student interactions with questions are there?

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What questions would you ask to help these students increase their understanding of content?

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How could you get students to ask good questions?

 



 

Watch these Evolution Case Study video segments: "Allele Question" from Ms. Havlik's class and "Working Together" from Ms. Chen's class.

Image of  a student  Image of  a student

Allele Question
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Working Together
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QuickTime | Real Player

In the activities shown in the videos, students ask questions that relate to the real-life nature of the simulations. What do you think would have happened if the teacher had responded with a question like, "Is that how it works in the 'real world'?"

 

Facilitator Note 3

 

Next: Explain Part B: Building on Prior Knowledge

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