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Posted December 8, 1997


My 8 year old loves science (and NOVA) but hates to read. During the broadcast of 'Avalanche' he asked what he should do if he is caught in an avalanche while cross-country skiing. I said he had a good question and that maybe it would be addressed on the NOVA web pages. Hurrah! He read it because he was motivated by the subject. We'll get him hooked on reading, yet. Thank you for having this great mixed media program available.

A.H.
Tacoma, WA




'Avalanche' is absolutely excellent! And your accompanying web site is outstanding. Thanks for putting all the time, money, and work into this project.

Cindy Meyer
Woodland Park, CO
einstein@market1.com




Great web site! Unfortunately I do not get public television in my home. Avalanches and avalanche safety is huge issue in this internationally known ski resort town. I edit two sections of our local weekly paper, the Jackson Hole News, and will run a brief in this week's paper about this fine site—very informative and nicely laid out. I wonder if it would be possible to borrow a video taped copy of the program? I sure would appreciate it. You can respond to me here or write to me at The Jackson Hole News, P.O. Box 7445, Jackson, Wyo., 83002. Thanks a lot. I look forward to hearing from you.

Richard Abendroth
Jackson, WY
jhnews@wyoming.com




Your fascinating program on avalanches brought back memories of the 1950s when I would climb with my parents to Tuckerman's Ravine on Mt. Washington over Memorial Day weekends. My father was a diehard spring skier (in the days before safety bindings!) and my mother and I game spectators. At the end of each day, the ski patrol would clear Tuckerman's, the Gulf of Slides, and Hillman's Highway, then shoot cannons at the sun-softened snow to induce avalanches. This made the next day's skiing safer. One issue I wish NOVA had discussed is the ecological impact of explosives and cannon shells. Producing avalanches on cue may be safer for humans, but what does it do to mountain environments?

Gail E. Anderson
Ipswich, MA
gail@shore.net




NOVA has been and continues to be one of the most thought provoking programs on television. The program that investigated avalanches was simply spectacular. I was thoroughly mesmerized by the photography and facts and details that I learned about these extraordinary phenomena. The bravery and dedication of the scientists and others who put their lives in jeopardy to protect others is simply uncommon. Please continue to produce these informative and stimulating programs.

William R. Earle
Danbury, CT
SKIPEARLPE@aol.com




We are doing research on natural disasters. This site was recommended as quality. It is great! We are 7th and 8th graders. Please post more information on what causes avalanches.

Future Problem Solver
Perrysburg, OH





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