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interview > heywood > heywood 6

Heywood 6 (1:25)
Topic(s): Auto Industry / Efficiency
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Heywood

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Video Transcript

One of the beauties of this engine, this internal combustion engine, is that its basic principles are simple. But the better we realize these principles in practice, the better performing, the more efficient the engine is. The basic principles, most people understand them. Fuel and air go into the engine, we've got pistons going up and down, we burn the mixture inside the engine, produce high pressures, high temperatures, those gases push the piston down, create work, the engine drives something. It drives the wheels of our cars. That's pretty simple and that hasn't changed.

But what we now understand better, but not yet completely, we understand better how to do that more effectively, how to do that with less friction, how to do that so the losses are minimized, how to get more energy out of the fuel. We're just learning how to do all that, partly because we think about it and we sort it out; partly we just experience empirically and we discover, "Hey, this works better. Let's do that." Then we say, "Well, let's do more of it." So, and then we put these things together. So that's how it gets better. And if you think of the size of the automotive industry, there are lots and lots of engineers out there working very hard, day by day, to make this engine better. It's a competitive business.

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