Visit Your Local PBS Station PBS Home PBS Home Programs A-Z TV Schedules Watch Video Donate Shop PBS Search PBS
homeprevious reportswatch onlineusteacher centernewsletteremail FRONTLINEFRONTLINE (home)
TEACHER CENTERSearch FRONTLINE
Roots of Terrorism
teachers guide

Student Assignment Sheet: Much Ado About Something

How to Read a Poem


Home
  • A Note to Teachers

  • Pre-Viewing Lesson Plans
  • Pre-Viewing Discussion Questions
  • Preparation for Viewing

  • Post-Viewing Lesson Plans
  • Debriefing Discussion
  • Help with Reading Poetry
  • Which Text Should We Read?
  • Parodies of Shakespeare
  • Further Activities with Language

  • Internet Resources

    Student Assignment Sheets
  • Shakespeare's Language (with answers)
  • Viewing Worksheet
  • How to Read a Poem
  • Some Sonnets by Shakespeare
  • To Be or Not To Be -- Three Versions
  • 1. Who is the speaker in this poem? What kind of person is he or she?

    2. To whom is he/she speaking? In other words, describe the speaker's audience.

    3. What is the situation and setting in time (era) and place?

    4. What is the purpose of the poem?

    5. State the poem's central idea or theme in a single sentence.

    6. Indicate and explain (if you can) any allusions. Do the allusions share a common idea?

    7. Describe the structure of the poem. What is its meter and form? (Scan it.)

    8. How do the structure of the poem and its content relate?

    9. What is the tone of the poem? How is it achieved?

    10. Notice the poem's diction. Discuss any words that seem especially well chosen?

    11. Are there any predominant images in the poem?

    12. Note metaphors, similes, and personification, and discuss their effects.

    13. Recognize and discuss examples of paradox, overstatement (hyperbole), and understatement (litotes).

    14. Explain any symbols. Is the poem allegorical?

    15. Explain the significance of any sound repetition (alliteration, assonance, consonance, etc.).

    16. Discuss whether or not you think the poem is successful.


    NOTE: The underlined words are the terms to use when discussing poetry from any era. They are useful in discussing prose as well.

    home » previous reports » watch online » about us » teacher center » newsletter » email FRONTLINE
    privacy policy » wgbh » pbsi

    web site copyright 1995-2014 WGBH educational foundation