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Two films depict 1970s Iran

02 Nov 2009 00:415 Comments

Albert Lamorisse (1922-1970)

Baadeh Sabah / The Lovers' Wind / Vent Des Amoureux [English language] [Farsi Version]
Shot 1970, completed posthumously 1978, 35mm

Title Unknown (Postscript to Baadeh Sabah)

A well-known French filmmaker, Albert Lamorisse, under the auspices of Iran's Ministry of Culture and Art, produced the poetic film "Lovers' Wind" (1969). Eighty-five percent of this dramatically visual film is shot from a helicopter, providing a kaleidoscopic view of the vast expanses, natural beauty, historical monuments, cities and villages of Iran. The "narrators" of the film are the various winds (the warm, crimson, evil and lovers' winds), which according to folklore, inhabit Iran. They sweep the viewers from place to place across the Iranian landscape, introducing the incredible variety of life and scenery in Iran. The camera, defying gravity, with smoothness and agility, provides a bird's eye view, caressing minarets and domes, peek-ing over mountain tops beyond, gliding over remote villages to reveal the life enclosed within the high mud-brick walls, bouncing along with the local wildlife, following the rhyth-mic, sinuous flow of the oil pipelines and train tracks, and hovering over the mirror-like mosaic of the rice paddies that reflect the clouds and sky. -- Hamid Naficy

(1971)
Audio/Visual: sound, color
Music: Francis Lai
18 Minutes

This film is best understood after watching Albert Lamorisse's Baadeh Sabah, an ostentatious propaganda film of the same commission that was originally rejected for it's inadequate portrayal of Iran's nouveau-modernism (urban youth, industrial marvels) and it's overly-lyrical style. In LeLouche's rendition, there are no such inadequacies. The focus is on culture -- heritage, modernity and (what soon would be named) Westernization. Past and present meet -- veils and miniskirts, camels and helicopters, remains of ancient Persia, the highlights of Islamic art, caviar and the oil fields and gas pumps.

Source: UbuWeb

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5 Comments

This is beautiful. Makes me miss land of my childhood.

Amid Ansari / November 5, 2009 5:08 AM

Thank you very much for this wonderful visual feast. Especially the Baadeh Sabah put me into a dreamy state. Is there any way of acquiring these movies for personal viewing albeit in a higher resolution?

Emir Polat / November 6, 2009 2:36 AM

Rice Farms Have turned into Highrises for profit, happiness has been turned into misery and tear.
Iran will rise again.

shahpour / November 23, 2009 7:01 AM

BE SERIOUS!!!
"This film is best understood after watching Albert Lamorisse's Baadeh Sabah, an ostentatious propaganda film of the same commission that was originally rejected for it's inadequate portrayal of Iran's nouveau-modernism (urban youth, industrial marvels) and it's overly-lyrical style. In LeLouche's rendition, there are no such inadequacies. The focus is on culture -- heritage, modernity and (what soon would be named) Westernization. Past and present meet -- veils and miniskirts, camels and helicopters, remains of ancient Persia, the highlights of Islamic art, caviar and the oil fields and gas pumps."
who-ever makes this ill-informed comment, should do a bit of research prior to such arrogant 'know all' judgment...
at the time of editing, lamorisse' film was hijacked by the shah's govt and forced into propaganda-and that's how lamorisse died ...

WishOneDay / December 18, 2009 6:44 PM

A revolution is never a good solution for us that is what we have learned. Reform is the best way. Even Shah started reform in 70s understanding that tradition and culture of Iran matters and that westernization is in fact not the solution for modernizing the country. This was reflected in art and architecture, when elements of modernity was mingled with traditional figures, in paintings of ahsaiee, naami, zendeh roodi etc...but also in architecture of seihoon...as well as the archtiecture of Abgineh museum, Farsh/carpet museum...and tons of others...in Rudaki/ Vahdat hall architecure...art biennals etc. 70s was the decade for arts flourishing in Iran and for education too! Now we have learned that revolution is not the best way to make Iran a better place....

Negar / March 8, 2010 11:07 PM