tehranbureau An independent source of news on Iran and the Iranian diaspora
nextback

Martyrs of the Green Movement

by MUHAMMAD SAHIMI in Los Angeles

19 Jun 2010 19:3523 Comments

Names of 110 killed in political violence over the past year.

Mousavi-supporter-Azadi-square-Tehran.jpgThe Iranian year of 1388 ended on March 20, 2010. It was one of the most turbulent years in the country's modern history. Its beginning and end were both marked by much promise, but for completely different reasons. The year had begun with the hope that the presidential election of June 12, 2009, would result in the election of a candidate with a vision for a better Iran -- a more open, more tolerant society, with less corruption, no political crimes, freedom of the press, and freedom of thought. This hope was dashed when the hardliners rigged the election and declared Mahmoud Ahmadinejad the "victor."

But precisely due to this antidemocratic fraud, the Green Movement that had arisen before the election gathered strength. It spread its wings and presented to the world a completely different image of Iran: a country with a young, educated, dynamic population that is willing to stand up to the forces of oppression and repression, express itself eloquently, and sacrifice for a better future. Thus, as Iran begins its new year, there is renewed hope.

The past year also recorded the largest number of Iranian people who lost their lives due to political violence since the bloody summer of 1988 (1367 in the Iranian calendar), when about 4,500 political prisoners were executed. The riots that erupted in mid-1992 and, particularly, the Eslamshahr riots of April 1995 did result in many deaths (though still not as many as in 2009), but they had mostly to do mostly with people's anger over rampant inflation and lack of basic services and were not fundamentally political.

How many people were murdered in 1388 due to political violence? No one really knows, and in a nation where there is virtually no independent press to serve as a watchdog, it is very difficult to get an accurate estimate of the total number of casualties. We can, however, distinguish between two groups among those confirmed as dead. In one group are those whose families have declared the martyrdom of their loved ones to the two committees that Mir Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi have set up for compiling the list of the killed. In the second group are those whose families have been under tremendous pressure not to report the death of their loved ones to the two committees, and not to speak to the press.

The credible Iranian sources reporting on the number of people killed include Norooz News, the website of the Islamic Iran Participation Front, Iran's largest political party and leading reformist group; Kalame, Mousavi's official website; and Kalameh Sabz, Jonbeshe-Rah-e Sabz, and Aras News, three reformist news sites supportive of the Green Movement. In a few cases, news wires aligned with the hardliners, such as the Fars News Agency, which is controlled by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, have also confirmed the deaths of demonstrators or those who were arrested.

Several organizations have also published lists of people whose deaths have been confirmed by multiple credible sources. One is the League for the Defense of Human Rights in Iran. Its list of confirmed murders, containing more than 100 names, was first published in August 2009 and updated on March 10, 2010. A list of 72 names was published by Aseman Daily News in September 2009. Norooz News just published the precise addresses of the graves of 50 people in Tehran's Behesht-e Zahra cemetery.

What follows is the list of 107 confirmed dead collated from all of the credible sources. Their age, if known, is in parentheses. First, a few statistics: 13 of the killed (12 percent) were women; at least 23 of them were university students (22 percent); two were tortured to death; two were journalists. In several cases, there is no information about how the victims were killed -- all we know is the location of their graves.

1. Neda Agha Soltan (27), university student, murdered on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
2. Kianoush Asa, university student, killed on June 15, 2009, in Tehran.
3. Behzad Aghazadeh Ghahramani, murdered on July 17, 2009, after the Friday prayers in Tehran led by former president Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.
4. Morad Aghasi, murdered on July 17, 2009, in the Kahrizak detention center on the southern edge of Tehran.
5. Mina Ehterami, university student, killed on June 15, 2009, in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory.
6. Hossein Akhtar Zand (32), murdered on June 15, 2009, in Shiraz.
7. Arman Estakhripour (18), beaten to death on July 13, 2009, in Shiraz.
8. Neda Asadi; nothing is known about the circumstances of her death.
9. Amir Eslamian, university student, working for Mousavi's campaign; his body was discovered on November 27, 2009, in Boukan.
10. Saeed Esmaeili Khanbebin (23), hit in the head and killed.
11. Sohrab Erabi (19), pre-university student, murdered in Evin Prison on June 20, 2009.
12. Alireza Eftekhari (29), journalist, killed by hits to the head on June 15, 2009; his body was given to his family the following month.
13. Naser Amirnejad (26), university student in aerospace engineering, killed in Yasouj.
14. Mohsen Entezami, murdered in the Kahrizak detention center on July 14, 2009.
15. Vahed Akbari (34), killed on June 20, 2009, after his arrest in Tehran's Vanak Square.
16. Hossein Akbari, killed by hits to the head on July 26, 2009.
17. Mohsen Imani, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
18. Fatemeh Barati, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
19. Mohammad Hossein Barzegar (25), killed by a bullet to his head, after being arrested in Tehran's Haft-e Teer Square on June 17, 2009.
20. Yaghoub Boroayeh, university student, killed by a bullet on June 25, 2009.
21. Jafar Boroayeh, assistant professor at the University of Ahwaz, killed by a bullet to his head on June 28, 2009.
22. Sorour Borouman (58), killed on June 15, 2009, in Tehran.
23. Hamed Besharati (26), blogger and poet; nothing is known about the circumstances of his death.
24. Jahanbakhsh Pazouki (31), killed by a knife on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura).
25. Mohammad Javad Parandakh, university student; nothing is known about how he was killed.
26. Dr. Ramin Pourandarjani, physician on duty in the Kahrizak detention center, presumably poisoned on November 10, 2009.
27. Amir Arshaf Tajmir, killed on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura) in Tehran.
28. Farzad Jashni, killed on June 20, 2009.
29. Somayyeh Jafargholi, university student, killed by a bullet on September 27, 2009.
30. Bahman Jenabi; nothing is known about the circumstances of his death.
31. Amir Javadifar, university student, arrested on July 9, 2009; died in prison.
32. Moharram Chegini Gheshlaghi (35); nothing is known about how he was murdered.
33. Mohsen Haddadi (24), computer programmer, killed by a bullet to his forehead on June 23, 2009.
34. Ali Hassanpour, killed on June 15, 2009, in Tehran's Azadi Square; his body was given to his family 105 days later.
35. Amir Mehdi Hamzehlouei, killed in Gheyterieh Park in Tehran on October 2, 2009.
36. Hesam Hanifeh (19), killed by a bullet to his chin on June 16, 2009.
37. Mehrdad Heidari, journalist, killed on July 13, 2009, in Mashhad.
38. Masoud Khosravi, killed in Tehran's Azadi Square on June 15, 2009.
39. Sh. Khezri, university student, killed in Tehran's Baharestan Square on June 15, 2009.
40. Abbas Disnad (40), killed by hits to his head on June 20, 2009; his body was given to his family after $15,000 was paid.
41. Mohammad Raeis-Najafi, beaten to death near Tehran's Azadi Square on June 15, 2009.
42. Mohammad Ali Rasekhi-Nia (40), killed by a bullet on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura).
43. Fatemeh Rajabpour (38), killed with her mother, Ms. Borouman (number 22 above).
44. Shahrokh Rahmani (26), run over by a car on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura) in Tehran.
45. Dr. Rahimi; nothing is known about the circumstances of his death.
46. Hamid Rezaei, killed on January 1, 2010, in Homayounshahr.
47. Ramin Ramazani (22); nothing is known about how he was murdered.
48. Mohsen Ruhol-amini (25), university student, killed in the Kahrizak detention center.
49. Babak Sepehr (35); nothing is known about how he was killed.
50. Fahimeh Selahshour (25), killed by hits to her head in Tehran's Vali-Asr Square on June 14, 2009.
51. Fatemeh Semsarpour, killed by a bullet on June 20, 2009, near Tehran's Azadi Square.
52. Ashkan Sohrabi (18), high school student, killed by a bullet in Tehran on June 20, 2009.
53. Tina Soudi, university student, killed by a bullet on June 20, 2009, in Tehran's Enghelab Square.
54. Hassan Shapouri, killed on July 14, 2009.
55. Ali Shahnazar (41), killed on September 29, 2009.
56. Ali Shahedi (24), killed on June 21, 2009, while detained by police.
57. Kasra Sharafi, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
58. Kambiz Shoaei, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
59. Shafi' Nejad, killed on June 15, 2009.
60. Zahed Shekarabi (20), tortured to death in Esfahan on July 21, 2009.
61. Yousef Saleh; nothing is known about how he was murdered.
62. Davoud Sadri (27), killed by a bullet on June 15, 2009, in Tehran; his body was given to his family after $6,000 was paid, plus a $350 charge for the bullet.
63. Seyyed Reza Tabatabaei (30), killed by a bullet to his head on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
64. Vahid Reza Tabatabaei (29), killed by a bullet to his head on June 26, 2009, in Tehran.
65. Hossein Toufanpour, killed by a bullet to his head on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
66. Hossein Tahmasebi (25), killed when his head was repeatedly hit by an object on June 15, 2009, in Kermanshah.
67. Salar Tahmasebi (27), university student, killed by a bullet to his head on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
68. Maysam Ebadi, killed by a bullet to his abdomen on June 13, 2009, in Tehran's Sadeghieh Square.
69. Saeed Abbasi (28), killed on June 20, 2009; his body was given to his family after $8,000 was paid.
70. Abolfazl Abdollahi (21), killed by a bullet to his head on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
71. Hamid Araghi, killed by a bullet on June 27, 2009; his family, initially told to pay $12,000 for his body, eventually paid $5,000.
72. Kaveh Alipour (19), killed on June 20, 2009; his family paid $3,000 to get his body.
73. Mostafa Ghanyan, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
74. Reza Fattahi, university student, killed in the Kahrizak detention center on July 14, 2009.
75. Ali Fathalian, killed in Tehran; nothing else is known.
76. Shahram Faraji (30), killed on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura) in Tehran.
77. Mehdi Farhadirad (34), killed by a bullet to his face on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura) in Tehran.
78. Mohammad Hossein Fayzi (28); nothing is known about how he was killed.
79. Sajjad Ghaed Rahmati; nothing is known about how he was murdered.
80. Salar Ghorbani Param (22); nothing is known about how he was murdered.
81. Rahim Mahmoudpour, killed by a bullet on August 3, 2009, in Tehran.
82. Hamid Maddah Shourcheh, university student, killed after his head was repeatedly hit by an object.
83. Moazzez (27), killed by a bullet to his eye on June 20, 2009, near Tehran's Azadi Square.
84. Pouya Azadbeigi, arrested on June 20, 2009, and died soon after his release.
85. Dr. Moghsoudlou; nothing is known about the circumstances of his murder.
86. Behzad Mohajer (47), killed by a bullet to his heart on June 15, 2009.
87. Maryam Mehraaein (24); nothing is known about how she was murdered.
88. Taraneh Mousavi, murdered on June 28, 2009.
89. Seyyed Ali Mousavi Habibi (42), nephew of Mir Hossein Mousavi, assassinated on December 28, 2009 (Day of Ashura) in Tehran.
90. Mostafa Mirebrahimi (22), killed under torture in August 2009.
91. Mohammad Naderipour, university student and Mousavi campaign worker.
92. Nader Naseri, killed on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
93. Ahmad Nejati, killed by hits to his head.
94. Ahmad Naeimabadi, killed by a bullet in Tehran's Azadi Square.
95. Iman Namazi, university student, killed in the attack on the Tehran University dormitory on June 15, 2009.
96. Mohammad Ali Nikzadi (22), architect, killed by a bullet to his abdomen on June 16, 2009, in Tehran.
97. Masoud Hashemzadeh, killed by a bullet on June 20, 2009, in Tehran.
98. Iman Hashemi (27), killed by a bullet to his eye on June 20, 2009, in Azadi Street in Tehran.
99. Mostafa Kashani Rasa, Mousavi campaign worker, killed by a bullet at the campaign headquarters in Gheytarieh, Tehran, on June 14, 2009.
100. Mohammad Kamrani (18), died in Tehran's Mehr Hospital.
101. Mehdi Karami (25), killed by a bullet to his neck on June 15, 2009, in Tehran.
102. Mostafa Karim Beigi (27), murdered by a bullet to his head on October 27, 2009.
103. Parisa Kolli (25), university graduate, killed by a bullet to her neck on June 21, 2009, in Tehran.
104. Majid Kamali (23), killed on August 25, 2009.
105. Amir Kaviri; nothing is known about how he was murdered.
106. Mostafa Kiarostami (22), killed by hits to his head on July 17, 2009.
107. Milad Yazdanpanah (30), killed by a bullet in Azadi Street in Tehran.

Three other people lost their lives for the Green Movement. One is Mohammad Asghari, who was a computer expert and worked for the office of computer security at the Ministry of Interior. He leaked a considerable amount of information about the actual vote count after the rigged June 2009 election and mysteriously lost his life in a car accident soon thereafter. It is widely believed that he was murdered.

The other two are Mohammad Reza Ali Zamani (37) and Arash Rahmanipour (19). They had been arrested before the election, but were hanged in early January 2010 in what is widely believed to be a message to the supporters of the Green Movement that they too could be hanged. Neither one had committed any serious offense.

In addition, Dr. Masoud Ali-Mohammadi, professor of physics at the University of Tehran, was assassinated. There is considerable evidence that he was murdered by the hardliners, although this is not a certainty.

These are freedom fighters who lost their precious lives for their ideals. Their place in history is assured. The Iranian people will never forget them.

Mir Hossein Mousavi has declared 1389 the year of patience, resistance against the hardliners, and efforts to achieve citizens' legal rights. Certainly, those who have lost loved ones need a lot of patience. Let us hope that by the end of the year Iran will be well on its way to a democratic society, so that those who lost their loved ones can see the fruits of their sacrifice.

Muhammad Sahimi is a columnist for Tehran Bureau.

Copyright © 2010 Tehran Bureau

SHAREtwitterfacebookSTUMBLEUPONbalatarin reddit digg del.icio.us

23 Comments

The world is waiting for the Movement's triumph!

Daniel Scott Smith / April 7, 2010 10:11 PM

Rest In Peace.

Ardavon / April 7, 2010 11:09 PM

The world will not forget. RIP.

Ally Bolour / April 8, 2010 12:15 AM

We will never forget you martyrs. We love you all for ever and ever.

We will carry on your path until we are victorious.

Victory / April 8, 2010 5:42 AM

What a loss!
What a waste!

pirooz / April 8, 2010 7:46 AM

" .............. This hope was dashed when the hardliners rigged the election and declared Mahmoud Ahmadinejad the "victor." "

As long as any segment of the Barbaric Republic of any shape or form is forced upon the Iranian people, it is simply wishful thinking to assume Iran will have a chance to join the civilized world.

This list of 107 is testimony to a lack of leadership and an irresponsible approach by those willing to sacrifice the lives of their fellow countrymen in order to save a segment of a form of governance that is nothing short of an insult to humanity in its totality.

Is it not about time for these people to gain the necessary courage to declare the Barbaric Republic void and null and allow the Iranian people a new beginning? How many more people have to die? How many more lives have to be destroyed?


What are the possibilities for wide spread strikes in Iran and how/what would it take to achieve a level of paralysis for this government to collapse?

Should there be a collapse, what are the alternatives? How can we create a management body to guide Iran while we seek permanent social, economic and political solutions/status?

What are our political assets abroad and how can we coordinate/utilize them efficiently in order to gain our objectives ASAP and stop these shameful killings?

REGIME CHANGE is the only logical solution.

Niloofar / April 9, 2010 12:10 AM

Niloofar:

The first line of your comment after the quote from the article goes to show how little you know about Iran and is exhibit 1 of your utter ignorance of the deep issues that Iran is facing.

Let us say that Mousavi and the rest do what you say, namely, declare the whole thing illegitimate. What do you think will happen?

There will be a sea of blood, compared to which 110 dead will be child's play. A regime that is armed to the teeth, has a social base, controls all resources of the state, and has weathered a long, 8 year bloody war is going to just go away by declarations and wishful thinking, or will fight back? If Mousavi and others had done what you suggest, the list of dead would have been thousands upon thousands.

There won't be any collapse. Do not fantasize about it. There are no foreign assets, other than ranters like you who are no asset at all. The possibility of wildcat strikes in Iran is, at this point, nill. Every industrial entity in Iran has a Muslim Association, a Basij Resistance Base, agents of the ministry of intelligence, and .... The regime learned its lessons from the Shah's downfall.

Democratization will be done by the Iranian people inside. Support them in anything that want to do the WAY THEY WANT to achieve it. Do not issue secular fatwa from far away. If you do not like what is happening in Iran, return there and fight, and be a model for the rest.

But, instead you only exhibit your utter lack of knowledge and understanding. You absolutely positively definitely know nothing about Iran. You simply rant, espouse nonsense, relieve your internal rage, and have one gaffe after another. The latest one:

You, the leader of the revolution, want regime change. Given your ardent support of Israel and the neocons, I suppose you support sanctions and military attacks. So, on the one hand, you shed tears for the martyrs, and on the other hand you want regime change that can be achieved, if at all, through vast bloodshed? What gives?

Am I wrong? Then, spell out how you think your regime change can be achieved without much bloodshed.

Clearly, people like Sahimi do not have your "intellectual superiority," "courage,"
"toughness," and "vision." So teach him and the other people who comment here what to do and how to do it. Or provide links to your "wonderful" writings elsewhere, if any exists.

Anonymous / April 9, 2010 4:10 AM

" .............. This hope was dashed when the hardliners rigged the election and declared Mahmoud Ahmadinejad the "victor." "

I was not taking about Mousavi Mr. Anonymous. I was talking about people like you. Why don't you wrap up your support for a bunch of archaic losers and give the Iranian people a chance for change? Enough of nonsense.

"Let us say that Mousavi and the rest do what you say, namely, declare the whole thing illegitimate. What do you think will happen?"

I would not give the time of the day to your Mousavi to begin with and Mousavi did declare it illegitimate and we all know what happened. Who are you kidding?

"Given your ardent support of Israel and the neocons..."

Thanks dear. My credentials are getting longer by the day. Thanks, but no thanks. You can keep them. I love my sense of nationalism. I do not believe in dealing with Israelis and neocons under the table. i.e. Your 2+6 extra years war. You know, the blood bath your Imam declared a blessing, Mr. Anonymous.

"This regime is strong," (your opinion), because we have islamist wolves in sheep clothing misguiding the general public for the last 31 years.

"Spell out how you think your regime change can be achieved without much bloodshed."

Why would I spell it out? What high school did you graduate from?
I spelled out what I know the likes of you cannot respond to and for obvious reasons.

The greatest thing about freedom is that I can post my thoughts without any obligations to provide any links. However, I have enough courage to post my thoughts under my own name. Do you Mr. Anonymous?

Stay focused Iran, victory is at hand.

Niloofar / April 9, 2010 7:49 AM

Dear anonymous,

We know well the likes of Niloufar.
Niloufars talk tough, but it is just a lot of hot air.

We know the type. They act like marines from afar, but they'd wet their pants at the sight of the first charging Bassiji. They never have the courage displayed by our young Iranian friends inside. So they talk.


There will always be people like Niloufar. Best to ignore them. Every balloon deflates in time.


Ahvaz / April 9, 2010 9:34 AM

Anonymous, you express my thoughts exactly.

Niloofar is the resident neo-con @ Tehran Bureau. Every site has one. At enduring america, "it" is called Megan. She claims to be an Iranian dedicated to Iran and the United States and actually spent pages and pages defending the US army after the video was released on wikileaks - that's how far they go. I can't see why/how any sane person would defend a massacre, it's just beyond me. Or, how after thousands and thousands of civilian deaths, they would still support an occupation.

Every site seems to have at least one. I say we just ignore them.

Houshang / April 9, 2010 6:12 PM

Anonymous & Houshang

Really more than strang comments to express your condolence on this page. You guys have lost your balance? You suffered of a total lost of human emotions? My advice: With your visions and your
heavy nightmares and with your unability to express
clear thoughts it should be better to go to a doctor.

gunni / April 9, 2010 8:21 PM

@Gunni

here are some quotes left by a "Gunni" on other websites. It may be a coincidence, but if it is you, then take your own advice and see a doctor:
Here you go:

"Hey LIBERAL MORONS,
HERE is what GATES.....rant rant rant..... It APPEARS, OBUMMER, that Palin WAS right SO SUCK IT LIBS
COMRADE ZERO DISARMS AMERICA AND LIBERAL IDIOTS CHEER

Or another briliant comment left by a "Gunni":

"OBAMA = NEVILLE CHAMBERLAIN IN BLACK FACE GOOGLE: "The Anti Liberal Zone" on blogspot. We KICK LIBERAL A S S THERE!"

here Gunni turns poetic:

"Oh yes I'm the great appeaser
Just laughing and gay like a clown
I seem to be what I'm not; you see
I'm wearing my tinfoil hat like a crown
Bowing to anyone that's around."

Anonymous / April 10, 2010 7:15 AM

In every country in the world – no matter where - despite different religions, enmities, different political beliefs or what ever - when people are reading the names of murdered human beings – human dignity requires to remain at least in secret understanding.

If there is anybody on this page with doubts, why the nightmare killer regime will quickly
come to an end after 31 years – please be so kind and read the contribution of anonymous.
No further explanation necessary.

gunni / April 10, 2010 8:23 PM

HOW TO EVALUATE THE QUALITY OF GOVERNANCE ?

JUDICIAL KILLINGS / EXECUTIONS

CHINA 2009

In 2009, Chinese authorities likely executed thousands of people - than any other country -according to an Amnesty International report published March 30. It is not possible to give an exact figure due to China's lack of transparency and the secrecy surrounding capital trials and state executions.

US, IRAN and SAUDI ARABIA 2009

The total of 714 documented judicial killings outside China
includes 52 in the U.S.
Iran executed at least 388 people
and
Saudi Arabia at least 69 of the 714 documented judicial killings.

EUROPE 2009

For the first time since the anti-death-penalty group started keeping track some 30 years ago, there were no executions in Europe.

Source: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1977126,00.html


Publicola / April 12, 2010 1:55 AM

we must all take a brake and cool off a little,we all have learned so much in the past years of iranian politics,accusations and name calling is so common that it has become a joke for me.if you do not beleive like i do then you are pro so and so.these are all utterly nonsense.dr.sahimi is just one political analyst with some very great points,we do not all have to agree with him 100 percent.we must first allow the iranian people the right to vote,then count their votes properly.this is the first step toward democracy.we have not been able to achieve that yet.so please every one step back,and stop name calling.we need people like sahimi with his deep knowledge to express himself.

fay moghtader / April 12, 2010 6:43 AM

WOW! There are no words that I can say to express my sorrow and sympathy for all that these people are working for. I truly wish for them to have the same rights and things that I have here in the U.S. I don’t know if there is anything I can do to help but I will pray to God to be with you all who are seeking the freedom and rights that all people should have no matter what their beliefs are or who they are.

Tonidas Whimper / April 12, 2010 1:05 PM

it was actually a good thing they died cuz they will go to heaven (inshallah)and they wont be left in hell and khamenei is the devil. staying in iran will such a cruel government is just not worth it so dying is just better in me opinion. we will fight for our freedom if its the last thing we do! We would rather die than surrender! marg bar dictator!

marwah a. / June 6, 2010 4:53 PM

It is clear where the author's sympathies lie. Not so much with the Martyrs of Iranians seeking FREEDOM, but with Mousavi, Karoubi & Rafsanjani Mafia seeking power.

These Martyrs deaths are well recorded by many with access to Internet and do not require Mousavi to setup a committee to record their names.

Tens of thousands of dissidents who were murdered during Mousavis's premiership do need an international committee to seek justice on their behalf.

Anonymous / June 21, 2010 7:40 AM

Thank you for compiling this list Dr Sahimi

Respect to these brave people who gave their lives for the freedom of Iran from the hands of Islamist terrorists. Sadly, I suspect we will find out in the future that the magnitude of the crimes of this regime is far greater than the list above.

Agha Irani / June 21, 2010 12:24 PM

ADD THISE:
AKBAR NOORI
MOTAHARE SAYYAHl
ANOUSHE ANSARI
MILAD MEYDAVOODI
HESAM NAVAB SAFAVI
JOOJE ORDAK E ZESHT
AFSARE ASADI
KOUROSH MASOMI
ALI DAEI
NOORODIN KIANOORI
ALI PATRICK PAHLAVI
JAVAD GHOURIL ANGHOURI

LEILIMOHSENI / June 30, 2010 11:26 PM

In many ways Iranians are more free than Americans. People (Americans) keep saying "democracy for Iran!" Why? So they can turn their back on their rich and beautiful culture and be like Americans? Most of the effect would be an increase in corporations dictating their culture, self identity, thought, what they ingest in their bodies (and minds), government policy, education and war. Also the result would be an increase in family disintegration, mental illnesses, social distortions, women walking around dressed like pigs, exploitation of children, divorce rates, addictions, superficiality of people, people becoming spiritless drones, an irreverence for God, etc.

Why would they want to be like Americans? So every other person can be seen walking down the street fixated on their Blackberries, I-Pods, cell phones, etc.; and spending their whole life in front of their laptops or watching Iranian Idol re-runs?

Jocko / July 2, 2010 11:03 AM

Jocko,

Its not a question of wanting to be like Americans - your analysis is quite wrong on this point.

Its a question that they wish to be afforded their human rights - those rights include the freedom of thought and the freedom of expression. Iranians need not lose their culture or become duplicate Americans in order to have their human rights - thats it period!

Agha Irani / July 3, 2010 12:13 PM

World won’t forget, won’t be fooled. No matter what we went through, one day they have to be responsible for all the brutalities they did to us at their notorious prisons just because we wanted a clear ANSWER that a silly one can’t be president.

one of the thousands innocents detainee / October 11, 2010 5:25 AM