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DEPRESSION: Out of the Shadows
Take One Step: A PBS Health Campaign
DEPRESSION: Out of the Shadows + TAKE ONE STEP: Caring for Depression, with Jane Pauley  

Faces of Depression

Philip Burguieres

Philip Burguieres
As one of the youngest CEOs ever to run a Fortune 500 company, Philip Burguieres had the world by the tail. But this self-described workaholic's predisposition toward depression eventually emerged. Fearing the backlash of stigma around mental health problems, Burguieres resigned. "I never thought I'd work again," he said. However, Burguieres eventually made a full recovery, creating a tailored health regimen that includes social support, healthy diet and exercise, spiritual pursuits, and reaching out to other executives battling depression. Burguieres re-entered corporate life as vice chairman of the NFL team, the Houston Texans.
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Josh Lipton and Wendy Clough

Josh Lipton and Wendy Clough
Eighteen-year-old Hart Lipton's struggle with depression began in the sixth grade. Initially diagnosed with a combination of depression and ADHD, Hart's treatments proved ineffective. Ultimately, his depression deepened to the point that suicidal feelings began to overwhelm him, and he requested hospitalization for his own safety.

Several years and several diagnoses later, Hart was diagnosed with Bipolar II. This disorder is often confused with depression, but is treated differently. Hart and his family found a treatment regimen that has virtually eliminated his depression.

Throughout Hart's experience, his parents Josh Lipton and Wendy Clough worked with mental health professionals and trusted their own insights to select therapies that would help their son. Hart, an accomplished artist, is now graduating from high school, and will begin college at the San Francisco Art Institute. His parents share their family's story, and discuss how the family supported Hart in finding effective treatment.
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Andrew Solomon

Andrew Solomon
By his mid-twenties, Solomon established himself as a multi-disciplinary wunderkind, earning international accolades for his work as a novelist, journalist and historian. After the death of his mother, the then 31 year old Solomon descended into a major depression, rendering him unable to work or even care for himself. He was helped by a combination of medications and talk therapy. This experience formed the bedrock for his National Book Award-winning Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, a tour de force examining the disorder in personal, cultural, and scientific terms.
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Terrie Williams

Terrie Williams
As founder of her own public relations agency, Terrie Williams represented the likes of Eddie Murphy and Miles Davis. But in addition to handling a superstar client list, Williams was also managing dysthymia, a form of low-level but debilitating depression. Eventually, she went public with her story, kicking off her commitment to guiding people in deep emotional pain onto a path of healing and wholeness. To this end, Williams started the Stay Strong Foundation, which serves the nation's youth. A licensed clinical social worker with degrees from Brandeis and Columbia Universities, Williams is also the bestselling author of four books, including her latest, entitled Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We're Not Hurting (Scribner).
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Ellie Zuehlke

Ellie Zuehlke
Together with her husband Jeffrey, Ellie Zuehlke anticipated the arrival of her first child with joy and excitement. Instead, she became one of the many women who experience postpartum depression. Ellie became a ghostly presence in her own home, disconnected from her son and husband and experiencing thoughts of suicide. With a combination of talk therapy, medication, and everyday support, Ellie emerged intact, crediting Minneapolis psychiatrist Dr. Helen Kim with saving her life. Now, three years later, Ellie and Jeffrey are expecting a second child and have a treatment plan in place.
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