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January 31, 2016

Leadership at the March through music and speeches – Lesson Plan

Subject

Social studies, English

Estimated Time

Two 45-minute class periods

Grade Level

Middle School and High School

Essential Question

Given the objectives of the March on Washington, how did the individual speeches address the March’s overall goals?

Warm Up Activities

  1. What do you know about the March?
  2. Music of the Civil Rights Movement

Main Activity

1. Goals of the March

  • Pass out the original March on Washington program and ask students if they recognize any of the speakers from page one.
  • Explain that besides Dr. King there were several civil rights’ leaders who spoke and organized the March. Explain that they will be put into small groups and will watch a short clip on the background of their leader and then listen to their leader’s speech from the March on Washington.
  • Before you split them into groups, as a class go over the goals of the March found on page 3, titled “What We Demand.” Discuss why organizers used the word “demand.” Give students a copy of the March on Washington handout and ask them to process the demands as civil rights’ goals.
  • Split students into four groups and assign each group a civil rights leader and do the following:
    • Have them watch the short biography on their leader and write down any Key Biographical Information on their worksheet.
    • Listen to the speech of their leader made at the March and write down and comment on any of the goals that were discussed during the speech. * You may need to pause the speech or listen to it several times to get all the information

Biographical Links

Links to Speeches

Have students come back together as a class and share the following information to each other:

  • What goals did your speaker cover?
  • How well were the goals addressed?
  • What did they not address?
  • Was there any particularly powerful part of the speech?
  • Were there any voices you feel were left out of the speech?

Extension Activities

  1. Essay- Evaluate one speech in terms of its effectiveness of addressing the goals of the March on Washington. Be sure to give background information on the speaker, and some contextual background for the speech and March on Washington.
  2. Two famous leaders Civil Rights Leaders, Bayard Rustin and Malcom X, attended the March, but were not asked to speak because of their radical backgrounds. Learn more about these dedicated and passionate men and their different views on how to create change.

By Syd Golston and Katie Gould, Teacher Resource Producer for NewsHour Extra

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  • Standards

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    Relevant National Standards:
      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.1 Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 8 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11–12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.8.4 Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound valid reasoning, and well-chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence clearly, concisely, and logically such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and task.

      CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

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