Announcement

“My Brother’s Bomber,” a Three-Part Series Beginning Sept. 29 | Press Release + Trailer

August 27, 2015

FRONTLINE Presents “My Brother’s Bomber”

Three-Part Series on One Man’s Search for the Terrorists Who Blew Up Pan Am Flight 103 Over Lockerbie Will Open FRONTLINE’s New Season

Premiering on PBS and online:
Tuesday, September 29, 2015, at 10 p.m. ET / 9 p.m. CT
Tuesday, October 6, 2015, at 10 p.m. ET / 9 p.m. CT
Tuesday, October 13, 2015, at 10 p.m. ET / 9 p.m. CT
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When filmmaker Ken Dornstein was 19 years old, his older brother David was one of 189 Americans killed in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Sc­­otland.

Some 25 years later, only one suspect — a Libyan man named Abdel Basset al Megrahi — was ever convicted of the terror plot, which killed 270 people in total. He was sentenced to life in prison but later released.

Who was really responsible for one of the worst terrorist attacks on Americans before 9/11?

In My Brother’s Bomber, an emotional and suspenseful three-part series that will open FRONTLINE’s 34th season, Dornstein embarks on a quest for answers.

Over the course of three one-hour episodes, he dives deep into the case files, assembles a list of suspected plotters, and realizes just how much about the downing of Pan Am Flight 103 has remained unresolved.

“The case isn’t finished, because all those responsible for the crime have not been identified and prosecuted, much less convicted,” Brian Murtaugh, the top U.S. prosecutor in the case against Megrahi, tells Dornstein.

“Lockerbie is still an open case,” agrees Richard Marquise, the retired FBI special agent who helped to lead the international investigation of the attack. “If I was writing the novel version, we would have identified not only the people who put the bomb on the plane, but those who ordered it up the chain of command.”

So Dornstein, who worked as a private investigator after graduating from college and later spent years at FRONTLINE as a senior producer, picks up where the official investigation left off.

Leaving his home and family in Boston for the ruins and chaos of post-Qaddafi Libya, Dornstein hunts for clues to the identities and whereabouts of the suspects, who he tracks for almost five years across the Middle East and Europe.

“If you talk to people who work with victims and survivors of crimes, having a satisfying account of what actually happened is really important,” says Dornstein. “I think there never was a satisfying account for me or for many of the other Lockerbie families.”

With each week’s episode, Dornstein, who previously wrote a book about his brother’s life (The Boy Who Fell Out of the Sky: A True Story, Random House, 2006), encounters new witnesses and unearths fresh evidence that brings him closer to the truth about what really happened.

“I started this process with questions that were significant enough to get me to go over the Tunisian border into Libya,” he says. “I don’t have those questions any more.”

Unfolding in three one-hour installments on Tuesday, September 29, 2015; Tuesday, October 6, 2015; and Tuesday, October 13, 2015, My Brother’s Bomber is a rare, real-life spy thriller, but also a timely reflection on the legacy of America’s long war on terror and a lyrical meditation on loss, love, revenge, and the nature of obsession.

About Ken Dornstein

Ken Dornstein has been involved in the production of over 50 documentary films, including Emmy-award winners such as Sex Slaves and A Death in Tehran. As a senior producer at FRONTLINE (PBS), where he worked for more than a decade, Dornstein also received a duPont-Columbia Award, an Overseas Press Club Award and other major industry honors. Dornstein produced Happy Valley, which premiered at Sundance in 2014, and is currently producing a documentary on The Grateful Dead. In addition to filmmaking, Dornstein is the author of several works of non-fiction, including The Boy Who Fell Out of the Sky: A True Story (Random House, 2006). Dornstein worked as a private investigator in Los Angeles after graduating from Brown University in 1991.

Credits

My Brother’s Bomber is a Tripoli Films production for WGBH/FRONTLINE. The producer, director and writer is Ken Dornstein. The executive producer of FRONTLINE is Raney Aronson-Rath.

About FRONTLINE

FRONTLINE, U.S. television’s longest running investigative documentary series, explores the issues of our times through powerful storytelling. FRONTLINE has won every major journalism and broadcasting award, including 69 Emmy Awards and 17 Peabody Awards. Visit pbs.org/frontline and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, Tumblr and Google+ to learn more. Founded by David Fanning in 1983, FRONTLINE is produced by WGBH Boston and is broadcast nationwide on PBS. Funding for FRONTLINE is provided through the support of PBS viewers and by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Major funding for FRONTLINE is provided by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the Park Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Wyncote Foundation, and the FRONTLINE Journalism Fund with major support from Jon and Jo Ann Hagler on behalf of the Jon L. Hagler Foundation.

Press Contact: Patrice Taddonio, Patrice_taddonio@wgbh.org, @ptaddonio, 617.300.5375

 

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