Frontline World

About the Series


images from the episode
images from the episode

Episode Guide
EPISODE 303
Airdate: March 25, 2004

• Overview
• TV and Web Credits
• Press

>>Transcript

OVERVIEW

Pakistan, ON A RAZOR'S EDGE
A journey home at a time of hope and crisis
Follow FRONTLINE/World reporter and producer Sharmeen Obaid to her native Pakistan as she investigates the clashes between President Pervez Musharraf, a key U.S. ally, and the increasingly powerful Islamic fundamentalists who oppose him. Obaid visits the scene of the most recent assassination attempt on Musharraf, meets with key military leaders and interviews a clandestine jihadi fighting a holy war in neighboring Kashmir. read more

Kyrgyzstan, THE KIDNAPPED BRIDE
The resurgence of a banned custom
FRONTLINE/World reporter Petr Lom travels to Kyrgyzstan, where an ancient tradition of bride kidnapping, banned by the Soviets, is resurgent. Lom gets inside families to talk with kidnapped brides -- those who have managed to escape from their captors as well as those who are making homes with their new husbands. read more

Kenya, RUN, LORNAH, RUN
Women racing for their lives

Kenyan men have long ranked among the world’s best long distance runners, but until recently, Kenyan women have been confined to traditional roles at home and on the farm. FRONTLINE/World reporter Alexis Bloom journeys to the mountain village of Iten in Kenya’s northwest highlands, where one of Kenya’s first great female marathoners, Lornah Kiplagat, using her prize money, established and operates a camp to train the next generation of women runners. read more

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TV AND WEB CREDITS

ON A RAZOR'S EDGE

Producer: EDWARD ROBBINS; Reporter and Co-Producer: Sharmeen Obaid; Editors: BEN GOLD, NANCY NOVACK; Camera: AHMAD KHAN, EDWARD ROBBINS; Sound: HABIBULLAH KHAN; Executive Producers: LAWRIE MIFFLIN, PHILIP BOAG; Director of Program Production: ANN DERRY; Special Thanks: GEO TELEVISION; JALAL and SATTI; HERALD MAGAZINE; ASIF SHAHZAD; AZMAT ABASS; Produced in association with New York Times Television

THE KIDNAPPED BRIDE

Reported, Produced and Filmed by: PETR LOM; Senior Producer: KEN DORNSTEIN; Editors: MICHAEL H. AMUNDSON, ANATOLY SIVOHA; Associate Producer: FATIMA SARTBAEVA; Music: ROSA AMANOVA; Special Thanks: SOROS FOUNDATION OF KYRGYZSTAN; OPEN SOCIETY INSTITUTE; CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY; AKTAN ARYM KUBAT; ASEL ALIYASOVA

RUN, LORNAH, RUN

Produced and Reported by ALEXIS BLOOM, CASSANDRA HERRMAN; Videographer: CASSANDRA HERRMAN; Editor: DAVID RITSHER; Additional Footage: LOS ANGELES MARATHON; Music: “BOMAS OF KENYA,” Provided by ARC MUSIC INTERNATIONAL, UK; Produced in Association with U.C. BERKELEY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM

FOR FRONTLINE/WORLD 303

Production Coordinator/Editor: David Ritsher; Associate Producers: SACHI CUNNINGHAM, SERENE FANG, BRENT MCDONALD; Web Producer: ANGELA MORGENSTERN; Web Associate Producer: SHERAZ SADIQ; Web Editor: SARA MILES; Web Site Design: SUSAN HARRIS, FLUENT STUDIOS; Promotion: ERIN MARTIN KANE, CHRIS KELLY; Production Assistant: DANIELLE GILLIS; Community Engagement: BRENT QUAN HALL; Interns: KRISTA MAHR, MICHAEL WELT; Legal: ERIC BRASS, DAVID MOYCE; Satellite Photos: SPACE IMAGING; Theme Music: SUPREME BEINGS OF LEISURE; Online Editors: MICHAEL H. AMUNDSON, MICHAEL SIMOLLARI; Sound Mix: JIM SULLIVAN; Post Production Supervisor: CHRIS FOURNELLE; Post Production Assistant: CHETIN CHABUK; Series Design: JOHN MACGIBBON; FRONTLINE Coordinating Producer: ROBIN PARMELEE; FRONTLINE Production Manager: TIM MANGINI; FRONTLINE Series Manager: JIM BRACCIALE; FRONTLINE Series Editor: KEN DORNSTEIN; Executive in charge for KQED: SUE ELLEN MCCANN; Executive in charge for WGBH/FRONTLINE: SHARON TILLER; Series Editor: STEPHEN TALBOT; Executive Producer: DAVID FANNING

WEB SITE 303 (Pakistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kenya)

Web Producer: ANGELA MORGENSTERN; Web Site Design: SUSAN HARRIS, FLUENT STUDIOS; Web Editor: SARA MILES; Copyeditor: JOAN SAUNDERS; Series Editor: STEPHEN TALBOT; Associate Producer: SHERAZ SADIQ; Web Research: KELLY WHALEN, KRISTA MAHR, DAVID MONTERO, MICHAEL WELT; Web Promotion and Outreach: BRENT HALL, JESSICA SMITH; Special Thanks: AMANDA HIRSCH, SAM BAILEY, SUZANNE ROMAINE, KEN DORNSTEIN, SHARON TILLER, SUE ELLEN MCCANN, ROBIN PARMELEE, JOHN MACGIBBON, MICHAEL H. AMUNDSON, ANDY ISAACSON, DAVID MOYCE, CAROL CICERONE, SACHI CUNNINGHAM, SERENE FANG, BRENT MCDONALD, BRIAN UNDERWOOD, RUNNING USA, FREQUENCY GLIDE ENTERPRISES, CHAHE DEMIAN, NATALIE ZEE

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PRESS REACTION

Obaid Shines for Frontline

Frontline [World] tonight presents one of its round-the-world editions, leading with a new dispatch from the intrepid 20-something Pakistani journalist Sharmeen Obaid. Western-educated and modern in every way, Obaid has shown a gift for getting even the most hidebound Taliban types to open up to her.

For Frontline [World], Obaid returned to her homeland to report on an historic development there that has gotten little coverage in the West: the delicate truce between Pakistan and India after decades of nuclear brinkmanship.

That's followed by a report from the remote former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan on a peculiar local practice of young men abducting their brides-to-be.

--The Kansas City Star

Bride-Stealing in Kyrgyzstan

Romance-based American reality TV shows may sometimes seem heartless, but they are nowhere near as brutal as the popular custom in Kyrgyzstan, where as many as a third of marriages are the result of kidnapping.

Locally, the practice is called ala kachuu, or "bride-stealing," according to a report by Petr Lom on FRONTLINE/World. And say what you will about the Soviet Union, at least they outlawed the practice when the country was still in its control.

Kyrgyzstan has officially banned it as well, but the report shows how prevalent it is, with young women being snatched from school buses and shop counters before being ganged up on by the prospective groom's female relatives. Once she's got on the bridal scarves, it's a done deal.

And in some cases, kidnapees learn to adjust to their new lives.

Other reports on FRONTLINE/World look at the new Pakistan, on the frontlines in the war on terrorism, and a report on the rise of female marathon runners in Kenya (and not because prospective grooms are chasing them, either.)

--Hartford Courant

Another timely edition of Frontline/World goes inside Pakistan to examine the state of the government and its battle against terrorism.

--USA Today

FRONTLINE/World: What's all this about instability in Pakistan? Where are the music and self-help shows pledge viewers paid to see?

--Chicago Sun Times

PBS' 'Frontline' looks into its crystal ball

There's a great old episode of "The Twilight Zone" about a newspaper that scoops the competition only because it hires a Mephistophelean typesetter (Burgess Meredith, smoking a bent cigar) who "prints" the tragic news before it happens.

Sometimes I think the folks at "Frontline [World]" (9 p.m., PBS) have a similar agent smoking out stories before the network and cable news giants get them. This rewarding newsmagazine consistently provides viewers with intelligent background on important developments, people, ideas and breaking stories, sometimes weeks in advance of its more popular competition.

Tonight's segment is a good example. As Pakistani and American troops scour the mountainous border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan for Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda lieutenants, "Frontline" looks at the increasingly precarious rule of Pakistan's leader, Gen. Pervez Musharraf.

-- United Features Syndicate

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