Frontline World

Afghanistan - A House for Haji Baba, Ocotber 2003


Related Features THE STORY
Synopsis of "A House for Haji Baba"

REPORTER'S SLIDESHOW
Behind the Lens

INTERVIEW WITH SARAH CHAYES
Danger, Determination and Destiny

INVISIBLE WOMEN
Politics, Security, Health, Education

FACTS & STATS
Government, Population, Economy

LINKS & RESOURCES
Background, Reconstruction Efforts, Warlordism

MAP

REACT TO THIS STORY

   

Invisible Women
Politics: Struggling to Speak Security: Fear and Violence Health: A Risky Place to Be Female Education: Learning for Change



Among the most powerful images from Afghanistan after the overthrow of the Taliban in 2001 were those of women shedding their burqas, going back to work and sending their daughters to school. As their country emerged from decades of war and repressive regimes, Afghan women, who had been nearly invisible during six years of fundamentalist rule, began actively participating in public life. But the initial promise of reconstruction has fallen short. Women still experience many of the same problems -- poor health care, illiteracy, lack of security and political powerlessness -- that they experienced under the Taliban. And they still face many of the same restrictions on their everyday lives. Rona Popal, president of Afghan Women's Association International, says the challenge now is "how to work with ordinary people to let them know that women are human beings."

POLITICS: Struggling to Speak
SECURITY: Fear and Violence
HEALTH: A Risky Place to Be Female
EDUCATION: Learning for Change


Lyssa Mudd is a journalist based in Berkeley.

Photos courtesy Sarah Chayes, Brian Knappenberger, and Eve Lyman.

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