FRONTLINE/WORLD . Liberia - No More War . Behind the Scenes: Two Opinions on the Mission in Liberia | PBS
Frontline World

Liberia - No More War, May 2005


Related Features THE STORY
Synopsis of "No More War"

WHO'S WHO?
Interactive Feature: In Conflict and in Peace

REPORTER'S SLIDESHOW
Keeping the Peace

BEHIND THE SCENES
Two Opinions on the Mission in Liberia

LIBERIA'S HISTORIC TIES TO THE U.S.
Similar Flags and Shared History

FACTS & STATS
Land and People, History and Government, Effects of War, Economy

LINKS & RESOURCES
Background, News, United Nations, Child Soldiers

MAP OF THE REGION

WATCH
Streaming video

REACT TO THIS STORY
Is the U.N. an effective peacekeeping operation? react

   


Behind the Scenes: Two Opinions on the Mission in Liberia

Jacques Klein

Jacques Klein
"I always keep in the back of my mind that 50 percent of all U.N. missions fail after five years. That's a fact. So how successful are we? We try to give Liberia a safe and secure environment because that's what investors are looking for..."

Under former U.S. general Jacques Klein, the United Nations' mission was to enforce the peace accord signed by the warring factions, disarm them and bring stability to the devastated country. Klein, who is known for his blunt, straight-talking manner, left the post in late April 2005, arguing that the United Nations needed a much tougher mandate in Liberia and should temporarily run the government there. FRONTLINE/World reporter Jessie Deeter interviewed Klein in November 2004 as disarmament was coming to an end. Read edited excerpts from Deeter's interview with Klein.

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Daniel Chea

Daniel Chea
"There are 50 persons trying to become president of this country and not one of them has mentioned the need for comprehensive security reform. I think they are making a serious mistake."

FRONTLINE/World reporter Jessie Deeter talks to Daniel Chea about his position as minister of defense in Charles Taylor's government during the brutal last months of the civil war. Now serving in the transitional government until elections are held in October 2005, Chea gives his assessment of what it will take to move Liberia beyond its current tenuous peace. Read edited excerpts from Deeter's interview with Chea.