FRONTLINE/WORLD . Liberia - No More War . Who's Who in Liberia's Fragile Peace and Former Conflict . Flash Version | PBS
Frontline World

Liberia - No More War, May 2005


Related Features THE STORY
Synopsis of "No More War"

WHO'S WHO?
Interactive Feature: In Conflict and in Peace

REPORTER'S SLIDESHOW
Keeping the Peace

BEHIND THE SCENES
Two Opinions on the Mission in Liberia

LIBERIA'S HISTORIC TIES TO THE U.S.
Similar Flags and Shared History

FACTS & STATS
Land and People, History and Government, Effects of War, Economy

LINKS & RESOURCES
Background, News, United Nations, Child Soldiers

MAP OF THE REGION

WATCH
Streaming video

REACT TO THIS STORY
Is the U.N. an effective peacekeeping operation? react

   



The murder and mayhem that marked Liberia's 14-year-long civil war ended in the summer of 2003 when Charles Taylor was forced out by international pressure and the rebel forces descended upon Monrovia, the capital city. More than 150,000 Liberians lost their lives as a tide of weapons, fighters and refugees flowed back and forth across borders, spreading violence throughout the West African region. The two rebel groups that ousted Taylor, Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy (LURD) and Movement for Democracy in Liberia (MODEL), had support from Liberia's neighbors. Taylor is wanted on war crimes, charged with fueling atrocities in Sierra Leone's civil war.

The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) brokered a Liberian peace in August 2003, and the United Nations took over, disarming combatants, reuniting child soldiers with their families and working to maintain stability as the country prepares for a historic election in October 2005.

This FRONTLINE/World interactive feature lays out the relationships among the factions, the countries and the organizations that waged a vicious war, forged a delicate peace, and will play a role in shaping the future of Liberia. Roll your cursor over the different actors to see how they interact with one another. Then click on the title cards to read more about the forces in play in Liberia.


Researched and written by Zachary K. Johnson

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