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Places of the Fillmore

From the days of the Great Earthquake to the first stages of urban renewal to today, explore the streets of the Fillmore and you'll discover the evolution of a neighborhood.

 
The Fillmore:
Then and Now
Fillmore Street
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Public Library
Fillmore Today
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Video Credit: KQED
Take a video tour of the Fillmore today
See San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake.
1906
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Video Credit: Library of Congress

 

Reggie Pettus' Chicago Barber Shop on Fillmore Street.

Reggie's Chicago Barbershop
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Photo Credit: KQED

 

The Chicago Barber Shop in its original location before redevelopment.

Chicago #3 Barbershop
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Photo Credit: WNET

   
Urban Renewal in the Fillmore

 

 

Phase 1 redevelopment map
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Photo Credit: KQED

Map of A1
The first phase of redevelopment in the Fillmore.

 

Redevelopment Phase A2
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Photo Credit: KQED

Map of A2
The second phase of redevelopment in the Fillmore that would target some 60 square blocks affecting more than 13,000 residents.
proposed redevelopment map
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Photo Credit: KQED
One alternative to destroying the Victorians was to remove the entire building and relocate it out of the area under redevelopment.
Fillmore Redevelopment
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Redevelopment Archives
Fillmore Redevelopment
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Redevelopment Archives
 
Fillmore Redevelopment
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Redevelopment Archives
Fillmore redevelopment
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Redevelopment Agency
Hamilton's Father's Church
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Photo Credit: Tony Hurd
The church that Reverend Wilbur Hamilton's father built. Hamilton would later demolish it while working on Phase A2 for the Redevelopment Agency.
Process of elimination: a Fillmore building transformed into its skeletal remains.

  building demolition
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Photo Credit: Tony Hurd

building demolition
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Photo Credit: Tony Hurd
building demolition
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Photo Credit: Tony Hurd

building demolition
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Photo Credit: Tony Hurd
Clubs of the Fillmore
Bop City sign
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Public Library
Fillmore Art Deco sign
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Photo Credit: San Francisco Public Library
Club Flamingo: one of the many clubs that used to form an archipelago of music in the Fillmore.
John Lee Hooker's The Boom Boom Room is one of the clubs that has rejuvenated the movement to bring music back to the streets of the Fillmore.
Boom Boom Room sign
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Photo Credit: KQED
Boom Boom Room exterior
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Photo Credit: KQED

"The Fillmore represented the pinnacle of creative music making in the late 1960s. The Fillmore audiences experienced a 2-year musical and cultural Renaissance that produced some of the most innovative, exciting music ever to come out of San Francisco."

         - from the Fillmore Auditorium web site

On the night of December 10, 1965, Bill Graham held his first concert at the Fillmore Auditorium as a benefit for the San Francisco Mime Troupe. Graham borrowed the auditorium from leaseholder Charles Sullivan. Sullivan an African American man who, during the 1950s and 1960s, was the largest promoter of black music west of the Mississippi. In 1966, Sullivan was found murdered and the crime has to this day remained unsolved.


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