More than 300 species discovered in Southeast Asia

BY Justin Scuiletti  June 4, 2014 at 6:37 PM EDT

A total of 367 new species have been discovered in Southeast Asia, according to a new report by the World Wildlife Fund.

The species — which include 290 plants, 28 reptiles, 24 fish, 21 amphibians, three mammals and one bird — were found in the Greater Mekong region in 2012 and 2013. The area, which consists of the countries through which the Mekong River travels, is not new to such discoveries: 1,710 new organisms were found between 1997 and 2011 in the same region.

The WWF provided images of several of the new species, which can be seen in their report.

The Cambodian Tailorbird (Orthotomus chaktomuk). Photo by James Eaton / Birdtour Asia

Orthotomus chaktomuk. Scientists described the Cambodian Tailorbird as “hiding in plain sight” in Cambodia’s capital of Phnom Penh. Photo by James Eaton / Birdtour Asia

Biswamoyopterus laoensisl. Photo by Daosavanh Sanamxay

Biswamoyopterus laoensisl. The Laotian Giant Flying Squirrel was discovered from an individual found in a local bush meat market in Ban Thongnami, Laos. Photo by Daosavanh Sanamxay

Hipposideros griffini. Photo by Vu Dinh Thong / Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, Hanoi

Hipposideros griffini. Griffin’s Leaf-nosed bat was discovered in 2012 in Cat Ba National Park in northern Vietnam. It’s unique nose is believed to assist in echolocation. Photo by Vu Dinh Thong / Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources, Hanoi

Lygosoma veunsaiensis. Photo by Gabor Csorba / Hungarian Natural History Museum

Lygosoma veunsaiensis. Discovered in a remote rainforest in Cambodia, this species of “rainbow” lizard, which is a new type of skink, possesses scales that refract sunlight to create rainbow colors. Photo by Gabor Csorba / Hungarian Natural History Museum

Rhacophorus helenae. Photo by Jodi J L Rowley / Australian Museum

Rhacophorus helenae. Helen’s Flying Frog was discovered near Ho chi Minh City in Vietnam. The large frog possesses fully webbed feet and webbing on their arms that allow them to glide from trees. Photo by Jodi J L Rowley / Australian Museum

Homalopsis mereljcoxi.  Photo by John C. Murphy

Homalopsis mereljcoxi. This snake, which possesses a Zorro-like mask, was found in Ban Badan Reservoir in Thailand. The snakes are “nocturnal ambush predators” that feed on small fish. Photo by John C. Murphy

Cyrtodactylus phuketensis.  Photo by Montri Sumontha

Cyrtodactylus phuketensis. This gecko, adorned with zebra stripes, was found on Phuket Island in southwestern Thailand. Photo by Peter Jäger / Senckenberg Research Institute, Frankfurt Photo by Montri Sumontha

 Blind huntsman spider, Sinopoda scurion.  Photo by Peter Jäger / Senckenberg Research Institute, Frankfurt

Sinopoda scurion. The blind huntsman spider was the first of its kind in the world to discovered to be without eyes. Museum of Research Institute for Aquaculture, Vietnam

Dendrelaphis nigroserratus. Photo by Sjon Hauser

Dendrelaphis nigroserratus. Found in Kaeng Krachan National Park in southern Thailand, this Sawtooth-necked Bronzeback snake possesses a thick black stripe that starts behind the eye and stretches down to the neck in a sawtooth pattern. Photo by Sjon Hauser

Editor’s note: This report has been changed to reflect the following correction. The report was issued by the World Wildlife Fund, not the World Wildlife Foundation, as originally reported.