This Georgia wildfire may not be extinguished until November, official says

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Smoke is seen during sunset as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia. Photo released April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Mark Davis via Reuters

Smoke is seen during sunset as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia. Photo released April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Mark Davis via Reuters

A wildfire in southern Georgia is burning so violently, it might not be extinguished until November, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said.

The West Mims fire started April 6, when a lightning strike sparked a flame in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Since then, the fire has expanded to cover over 100,000 acres of the refuge. As of May 1, the blaze has destroyed 25 percent of the refuge, and only 8 percent of the fire has been contained.

The West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in a photo released in Folkston, Georgia, on April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Reuters

The West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in a photo released in Folkston, Georgia, on April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Reuters

“November is the worst-case scenario,” Mark Davis, a spokesperson for the service, told Reuters. “The firefighters’ plan is to contain the fire as best they can, hoping that nature will cooperate with some rainfall.”

Firefighters have been working to contain the fire, aided by helicopters, bulldozers and thousands of gallons of water.

A firefighter watches a helicopter above Georgia Highway 177 as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, on April 25, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Mark Davis via Reuters

A firefighter watches a helicopter above Georgia Highway 177 as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, on April 25, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Mark Davis via Reuters

An airplane drops fire retardent as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in a photo released in Folkston, Georgia, on April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Reuters

An airplane drops fire retardent as the West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in a photo released in Folkston, Georgia, on April 29, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Reuters

The West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, U.S. April 25, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Michael Lusk via Reuters

The West Mims fire burns in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, Georgia, U.S. April 25, 2017. Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Michael Lusk via Reuters

Recent wildfires have scorched the southern United States. Nearly 1,500 wildfires hit Florida earlier this spring, and a wildfire torched dozens of homes in Tennessee late last year.

As of now, the wildfire has avoided residential areas, but the smoke has drifted into some nearby towns, such as Waycross. Multiple counties have declared states of emergency since the start of the fire.

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