Jeb Bush will campaign with his brother in South Carolina

BY  
Republican presidential candidate and former Florida governor Jeb Bush talks to a reporter before leaving the Manchester precinct, Webster Elementary School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Feb. 9. Photo by Faith Ninivaggi/Reuters

Republican presidential candidate and former Florida governor Jeb Bush talks to a reporter before leaving the Manchester precinct, Webster Elementary School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Feb. 9. Photo by Faith Ninivaggi/Reuters

COLUMBIA, S.C. — GOP presidential contender Jeb Bush is defending his decision to bring his brother, former President George W. Bush, to South Carolina to help him campaign.

On Monday, the former president is expected to accompany Bush to a campaign event in North Charleston.

Bush told ABC’s Good Morning America on Friday that greeting voters with the elder Bush wasn’t a sign of desperation, as Donald Trump suggested at one point. George W. Bush left the White House in January 2009 with low approval ratings.

The GOP candidate said his brother remains popular in South Carolina because of his administration’s unwavering support of the military. Jeb Bush declared, “this is the beginning of the campaign” and “for my brother to speak on behalf of the skills I have to lead this country will be quite helpful.”

In another development, former South Carolina first lady Iris Campbell is endorsing Bush for president, further cementing a long-standing relationship between the two families.

The campaign announced Friday that the wife of late South Carolina Gov. Carroll Campbell would be backing Bush, as she and her husband did for his father and brother.

The late governor, a conservative icon in South Carolina, helped elect both former Presidents George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush to the presidency, serving as campaign co-chairman for each when they sought the White House.

Campbell also headed up Washington, D.C.-based efforts to elect Jeb Bush as Florida governor in 1998. Carroll Campbell died in 2005 after battling Alzheimer’s.

SHARE VIA TEXT