Timeline of Events Revolving Around Gen. David Petraeus’ Resignation

BY P.J. Tobia  November 12, 2012 at 4:50 PM EST


A June 23, 2011 photo shows Paula Broadwell (second from left) watching as Gen. David Petraeus (right) and his wife Holly Petraeus (third from left) arrive for a Senate Select Intelligence Committee hearing on Petraeus’ nomination to be director of the Central Intelligence Agency on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Photo by Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images.

An FBI investigation into harassing emails from a former Army officer and biographer Paula Broadwell revealed an extramarital affair with retired Army Gen. David Petraeus. President Obama accepted Petraeus’ resignation as the head of the CIA on Friday. We have a breakdown of developments:

Spring 2006: Paula Broadwell and David Petraeus meet for the first time during a social event at Harvard University, where Broadwell was a graduate student at the Kennedy School of Government.

Petraeus, then a lieutenant general working on a major counterinsurgency manual, had been invited to speak on his experiences in Iraq. After the talk, Broadwell — an Army reservist and fellow West Point graduate — attended a dinner with the general and a few other students. It was there, according to her book “All In: The Education of General David Petraeus,” that Broadwell first introduced herself to the general and told him of her research interests in leadership.

2008: While pursuing a doctorate, Broadwell decides to do a case study of Petraeus’ unique leadership style. After several email exchanges, Petraeus invites her to discuss the research during a run along the Potomac in Washington, D.C.

According to reports, Broadwell impressed the general with her ability to match his “grueling, six-minute-mile pace.” Sometime soon thereafter Broadwell decides to turn the dissertation into a book.

2008-2010: Jill Kelley, the Florida woman whose report of harassing emails eventually exposed the entire affair, meets Petraeus while he is the head of the Tampa-based U.S. Central Command.

At the time, according to a military official quoted in the Washington Post, Kelley was an unpaid social liaison to MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, near CENTCOM headquarters.


Gen. David Petraeus, then commander of U.S. Central Command, walks back to his helicopter with his entourage on Oct. 28, 2009 at Forward Operating Base Wilson in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images.

2010: Petraeus is placed in command of the war in Afghanistan, and Broadwell begins making several trips to visit and observe him in the field. In a speech this summer, Broadwell said she was allowed into a number of high-level meetings with the general during her trips. Their relationship, according to reports, had not yet progressed beyond anything strictly professional.

August 2011: Petraeus retires after nearly four decades in the Army. A month later he’s sworn in as director of the CIA. It is during this period that his intimate relationship with Broadwell reportedly began.

January 2012: Broadwell’s book about Patraeus, “All In: The Education of David Petraeus“, which she co-authored with a Washington Post editor, is published.
She appears on the Daily Show with Jon Stewart to promote the book, where she talks about the level of access she was given to Petraeus.

Summer 2012: Jill Kelley, 37, tells an FBI agent, who is a personal friend, that she has been receiving harassing or threatening emails from Broadwell. Kelley and her husband spent time socially with Petraeus and his wife Holly Petraeus when the general was stationed at CENTCOM, even hosting Petraeus and his wife at their million-dollar home in Tampa Bay’s Bayshore neighborhood. The FBI begins an investigation into the emails.

Late summer: The FBI and Justice Department are notified by their agents that the investigation into the threatening emails led them to evidence of an extramarital affair between Petraeus and Broadwell. Sometime during this period, the FBI agent friend of Kelley’s is removed from the case. His name has yet to be made public.

Oct. 27, 2012: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor’s office gets a call from an unnamed FBI source, notifying him of Petraeus’ affair. Cantor wanted to call the FBI immediately to confirm, but could not due to events surrounding Hurricane Sandy.

Oct. 31: Cantor’s office calls the FBI chief of staff, saying it heard from an FBI whistleblower who raised concerns that the Petraeus matter was being covered up or not being taken seriously.

“I was contacted by an FBI employee concerned that sensitive, classified information may have been compromised and made certain (FBI Director Robert) Mueller was aware of these serious allegations and the potential risk to our national security,” Cantor said in a statement.

Nov. 2: The FBI interviews Broadwell for the second time, according to NBC News, citing an unnamed, senior U.S. law-enforcement official. The interview, along with another with Petraeus, “allowed the FBI to formally conclude there was no basis for criminal charges in the matter.”

Nov. 6, Election Day: Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is informed of the FBI investigation and the Patraeus-Broadwell affair.

Nov. 8: Petraeus submits his resignation to President Obama.

Nov. 9: President Obama accepts Petraeus’ resignation.

Nov. 11: Kelley is named as the woman who received the emails from Broadwell.

Updates:

Nov. 13: Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says the Pentagon has begun an internal investigation into emails between Gen. John Allen, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, and Jill Kelley.

Nov. 14: President Obama says at a press conference that there is no evidence classified information was compromised in the Petraeus matter.

Nov. 16: The CIA launches an investigation into whether Petraeus used any agency resources to carry out his affair with Broadwell. The FBI already has determined he did not mishandle classified information.

Petraeus testifies on Capitol Hill about what the CIA knew about the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Jan. 22, 2013: A Defense Department inspector general investigation into allegations of professional misconduct clears Allen of wrongdoing.