These photographs capture the eclipse as it crosses the continental U.S.

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A cheerleader uses solar viewing glasses before the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. Photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

A cheerleader uses solar viewing glasses before the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. Photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

Stargazers across the United States readied their solar glasses, pinhole projectors and specially-outfitted telescopes today to witness the cosmic event of the year.

For the first time in nearly a century, a total solar eclipse is casting a shadow from coast to coast and plunging millions of eager onlookers into temporary darkness. Those lucky enough to be standing under the path of totality — the 70-mile-wide, 3,000-mile-long swatch directly below the shadow of the moon — will be treated to a view of the moon fully blocking out our sun.

A woman looks through a telescope on the football field at Madras High School the evening before a solar eclipse in Madras, Oregon. Photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

A woman looks through a telescope on the football field at Madras High School the evening before a solar eclipse in Madras, Oregon. Photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

But other Americans can take part, too, because everyone in the continental U.S., Hawaii and Alaska will be treated to at least a partial eclipse — provided cloudless skies clear the way.

From the “first kiss” in Lincoln Beach, Oregon, to the final moment of totality in Charleston, South Carolina, here are some of the memorable moments of 2017’s total solar eclipse.

A worker passes out solar viewing glasses to guests at the football stadium before the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. Photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

A worker passes out solar viewing glasses to guests at the football stadium before the total solar eclipse at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois. Photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

People use solar viewing glasses as the sun emerges through fog cover before the solar eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

People use solar viewing glasses as the sun emerges through fog cover before the solar eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

The sun is partially obscured during the solar eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photos by Mike Blake/Reuters

The sun is partially obscured during the solar eclipse in Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photos by Mike Blake/Reuters

Eclipse fans stand in line to look through a telescope as they wait for the beginning of the solar eclipse at the James Bruce Convention Center in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Photo by John Sommers II/Reuters

Eclipse fans stand in line to look through a telescope as they wait for the beginning of the solar eclipse at the James Bruce Convention Center in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Photo by John Sommers II/Reuters

People watch the solar eclipse during the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience at Madras High School in Madras, Oregon. Photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

People watch the solar eclipse during the Lowell Observatory Solar Eclipse Experience at Madras High School in Madras, Oregon. Photo by Jason Redmond/Reuters

People watch the solar eclipse in Nashville, Tennessee. Photo by Harrison McClary

People watch the solar eclipse in Nashville, Tennessee. Photo by Harrison McClary/Reuters

Tanner Person (R) and Josh Blink watch the total solar eclipse while standing atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

Tanner Person (R) and Josh Blink watch the total solar eclipse while standing atop Carroll Rim Trail at Painted Hills, a unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, near Mitchell, Oregon. Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

People watch as the solar eclipse approaches totality from Clingmans Dome, the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

People watch as the solar eclipse approaches totality from Clingmans Dome, the highest point in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee. Photo by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Members of the media watch the solar eclipse at the White House in Washington D.C.. Photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

Members of the media watch the solar eclipse at the White House in Washington D.C.. Photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

The sun is obscured by the moon during the solar eclipse as seen from an Alaska Airlines commercial jet at 40,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters

The sun is obscured by the moon during the solar eclipse as seen from an Alaska Airlines commercial jet at 40,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Depoe Bay, Oregon. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters

Brothers Chris and Gabe Fabiano watch the solar eclipse  on the beach on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Brothers Chris and Gabe Fabiano watch the solar eclipse on the beach on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

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READ MORE: 5 things you should remember as you prepare for the great solar eclipse

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